GE stops making its iconic bulb in the U.S.

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http://www.walletpop.com/blog/2010/09/30/the-last-american-light-bulb-ge-stops-making-its-iconic-bulb-in /
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 10/1/2010 12:10 PM, willshak wrote:

http://www.walletpop.com/blog/2010/09/30/the-last-american-light-bulb-ge-stops-making-its-iconic-bulb-in /
Also look at the link there:
http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/politics/GE-backed-regulations-that-killed-GE-jobs-in-U_S_-984209-103727674.html
GE pushed for the legislation for bulbs and are sending production to Mexico and China. I would think that bulb making would be highly automated, a job that could have stayed here with our higher worker wages.
For those that think we should buy American, look at GE.
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Sure, pal!
I think Rusk should be able to dump his old car crankcase oil in the storm drain, throw his broken tv's and refrigerators on the side of the road, and burn witches at the stake. fortunately, not everyone is equally as stupid.
While I have few illusions about GEs motives, the end result is for the better and allowing ppl to adhere to outdated energy wasting technologies does us no good in the long run. Rusk wants to make his own incandescent light bulb, no one is stopping him. Edison did it. But, supplying the lazy self-indulgent masses with highly detrimental technologies, like polluting cars, should not be allowed jes cuz it may preserve someone's freedom of choice.
nb
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notbob wrote the following:

I strain my dirty crankcase oil and pour it in my household fuel oil tank. I also dump my old TVs and other items on the side of the road, but only twice a year in the spring and fall. The highway department picks them up in their regularly scheduled cleanup program. Which reminds me, I have to get the stuff out before next week, so the 'pickers' get first dibs on it..

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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?

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/politics/GE-backed-regulations-that-killed-GE-jobs-in-U_S_-984209-103727674.html
what would edison do?
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WWED. That's profound. I think he would reccomend lower taxes, and a severe reduction in the government meddling.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
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Lie like a rug and screw everyone within a 5 mile radius.
nb
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On Fri, 01 Oct 2010 12:10:41 -0400, willshak wrote:

ge-stops-making-its-iconic-bulb-in/
I'm buying as many bulbs as I can. They will be worth millions some day.
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I really doubt it. The CFLs keep getting better and they are cheaper to operate. Keeping your head in the sand is your option though. How is that 8088 computer working for you? DOS makes it so simple to use.
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On 10/2/2010 7:52 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Hey! Watch your mouth! I still have one of those over in the corner, there. (Really need to light it up some day, and see if the hard drive still spins...)
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aem sends...

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wanna buy a 56K modem for it? I still have a 56K *real* (not winmodem) ISA modem. Looks like I should have put it up for sale while it was still worth anything.
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AZ Nomad wrote:

I've still got a 9600 baud USR modem, serial connection.
Well, I did, but it went to the dump a few months ago during one of the purges.
Still have a 28.8 hardware faxmodem around here somewhere, though. Shame it won't work on my Comcast phone line, though. Bastards.
Jon
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On 10/2/2010 10:11 AM, AZ Nomad wrote:

Chuckle. That is why I never bothered to sell it. Kaypro suitcase machine, which was actually born as an 8086, but I upgraded to a V20, maxed out the ram when I found a card at a hamfest, replaced one of the 360 5.25" floppies with a then state-of-the art 720 3.5", and even found a way to shoe-horn an MFM 10mb hard drive in there. Pretty hot stuff in 1986. By 1990, not worth a damn thing on the open market, and it had enough sentimental value to me, that as long as I have a spare corner, I'll keep it. If my 4 YO niece gets into computers when she grows up, maybe I'll stick her with it, to eventually show to HER kids. All my later computers of the 286/386/486/early pentium era are long gone, but you always have a soft spot for the first one you played with the guts of.
No room inside for a modem, by the way. I used a 1200 external with it, and my first cable was rat shack ribbon cable, paper clips, and masking tape. Kaypro did NOT use a standard cable for their serial port, and it took me months to find where to order one. But the damn thing did come with full docs, just like the test equipment that was obviously the source of the parts they used. Very 'old school' inside. Even has an external fuse socket on the back, just like an old stereo amp.
--
aem sends...



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I have a original IBM PC AND a VCR, will make someone a real deal if they want 1 or both
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On Sat, 02 Oct 2010 09:05:38 -0700, gnu / linux wrote:

bulb-
BAH! I own 2 working IBM PS/1 models. An Everex 286, a DEC terminal, a working Sony Betamax and a working Atari 2600 so there neener neener :)
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A. Baum wrote the following:

I have a Commodore 64 stored away. But the earliest video game player I have stored away is a Magnavox Odyssey video game console still in its original box That was the one where a clear plastic sheet was placed over the TV screen for various video games, like "Pong" and skiing. Very primative compared to now, but real fun when first introduced back in 1972.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I still use my TI 99-4A from time to time. I like to hear the guy from the mountain climbing game scream when one of the boulders hit him (g).

My first one was the original Pong game with the controller you both had to use.

--
I want to find a voracious, small-minded predator
and name it after the IRS.
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On Sat, 02 Oct 2010 13:40:57 -0400, willshak wrote:

LOL I remember the Magnavox! Since I have the time and remember the story and am on caffeine power I will tell you a story about the Magnavox and how they fought in court with some other manufacturers over just who invented the first video game. Enter William Higinbotham the real inventor of the first video game. Someone you probably have never heard of and would have gone unheard of had it not been for the lawsuits. It seems William, a physicist at Brookhaven Nuclear Laboratory in Long Island NY was working on a timing device for a nuclear detonator. He was also trying to come up with a 'hands-on' exhibit device for the lab's visitor day. He gathered up an oscilloscope and an old 'analog' computer (not digital as today's computers are) that he could hook together in a way that a 'ball of light' would bounce randomly around the oscilloscope's screen. He found that he could make a game with a ball of light that bounced back and forth as a tennis ball does in a game looking from the side. Two people played using control boxes that had a serve button and a control knob that determined how hight the ball was hit.
Is this starting to sound familiar? This happened in 1958 :) He labeled the game Tennis for Two. After visitors day he took the game apart and never re-assembled it. Nor did he patent it. Like I mentioned before had it not been for the lawsuits in 1970 between Magnavox and others William would have been long forgotten. A patent lawyer for one of the others found out about William and brought him into court to prove he was the true inventor of the first video game and not Magnavox. William died in 1994 and never made a single penny off his invention. Actually he couldn't have since he invented it while working for the US government. If he had patented it the government would have owned the patent.
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wrote:

I have an original ("first day order") PC with expansion unit (with a whopping 10MB disk drive) and a "new" VCR.
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On 10/2/2010 8:57 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Hey, vcrs still have their place. Lotsa old movies for a quarter each at garage sales. I think I still have 3 of them, but haven't lit them up in at least a year.
Somewhere, I still have one of those back plates to convert a 5-slot case from the original PC, into an 8? slot case so a modern motherboard would fit in it.
--
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