GE Range @208V

I am looking for replacement oven elements that would get the output on 208V close(r) to the standard elements at 240V. Model is JBP90B. So far, I've found nothing.
Failing that, what is the viability of using a transformer? I've read about "buck boosts," but apparently the sizing and wiring aren't straightforward.
Thanks.
Mike
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snipped-for-privacy@mailexpire.com (Michael S. Trachtenberg) wrote in message

Hi,
That is part of the full model#. 2 that I found.... JBP90BF1BB JBP90BF2BB
Neither listed 208 volt elements in the parts breakdowns but GE -may- have something for them....have you asked them?
http://www.applianceaid.com/phone.html Need a Manufactures phone#...some common ones are on this page in alphabetical order.
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (jeff) wrote in message

Yes. Their reply was have an electrician provide 240V. Is this how it's usually done? IOW, if you're at 208, you're stuck? Thanks.
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Hi Mike,
Haven't found any 280V elements available, and after giving it some thought, I can understand why. If the range were fitted with 208V bake and broil elements, and was later sold to someone who used it on 240V, GE wouldn't want the liability. I wouldn't either.
Hope that's of some help.
God bless,
Dave Harnish Dave's Repair Service New Albany, PA www.DavesRepair.com snipped-for-privacy@sosbbs.com 570-363-2404
I'm a 32-year pro appliance technician, and love sharing what I've learned - in a FREE Monthly Appliance Tips Newsletter. (Back issues now posted here too!) www.DavesRepair.com
John 14:6

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I wouldn't think so (at least for use in this country).
:)
Dan O.
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The whole thing stinks. Sort of like buying a car rated at 200HP, but only 150HP on the grade of available fuel. Surprised class action lawyers haven't worked themselves into a tizzy like they did over monitor sizes.
Anyhow, Mom is following up with building maintenance to see what other people are doing. She also told me her friends have had motors in major appliances burn out after four years. I can't imagine why. :-(
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Years ago when I was doing apartments with a 3phase 208 volt service, we would use 2 phases for each apartment. Water heaters, and the ranges were an issue for like 20 minutes. It will run just fine with 208, just will not get as hot. There are thousands of apartments like this all over Phoenix. No worries mate
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"[J]ust will not get as hot" is the key. You're cutting output 25%. It lenghtens warmup and makes broiling less effective. The stove obviously doesn't matter, unless you boil lots of water.
BTW, this is my mother's range. She moved to an apartment building from a 240V house and has been disappointed and vocal about the oven, especially since she likes to cook. Took me a little while to figure out what was going on. I ASSumed retrofit elements were available, but haven't found any yet.
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were an

get
No
Then have a buck/boost transformer installed.
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we
not
Oops, sorry, can't use a buck/boost transformer on a range that requires a neutral.
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Remember that the elements are actively thermostatically controlled, meaning for the most part, the duty cycle just goes up a bit and yields exactly the same temperature in the end. For baking, it ain't going to make a difference.
A trifle slower on warmup. May make little difference with broiling.
It may more be a difference in the appliance than the voltage.

For the most part, stoves are sold as being compatible with both 240V and 208V. Dryers too. Which means that 208V-specific elements are going to be very hard to find.
A transformer for that wattage is going to be expensive and large. You could buck-boost even with that neutral, but you'd have to rewire the stove _itself_ so that it only applies to the elements. Yuck.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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