GE Profile dishwasher

GE Profile dishwasher. Doesn't drain except on hottest cycle. Then drains 80% of times I run it. Also, rarely cleans what is on the upper level; rather it usually leaves a residue on glasses in upper level. (once had the arms blocked with olive pips, pieces of fibre etc on a dishwasher on that upper level: IMPOSSIBLY difficult to get out!). Sometimes gets glasses clean on hottest cycle if I dare leave them in.
Otherwise has to drain manually, - meaning pushing the run cycle and then stopping it after five seconds. A few times doing this makes it drain completely.
Now it seems the expansion of the plastic on running the cycle so often has made the innermost spike which feeds water to the upper level come out!
Any way of getting it back in again? How does that lower spinner come out? (when I get it out, I will clean out that lousily designed hidden lower basket where the cutter-impeller which substitutes for a filter resides: Reasonably sure copper drain pipe isn't blocked)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Had this problem with a washing machine not draining right. Turned out, the level of the drain pipe outlet relevant to the washer was critical. Shoved it further down the drain, and the washer operated properly. Evaluate your placement of items on the lower level; perhaps they are interfering with a water jet directed to the upper arm in the middle from below.
JR
news.rcn.com wrote:

--
--------------------------------------------------------------
Home Page: http://www.seanet.com/~jasonrnorth
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, I am pretty sure this isn't the reason: The washer worked for three to four years prior to starting acting in this way and it is intemittent.
In addition I am reasonably sure that nothing in the lower level is consistently interfering with the water spout to the upper level (except of course that the upper telescopic part of the feeder 'pipe' has now come off:
Which curiously doesnt make the unit perform much worse than when it was there!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com> wrote in message

I have to wonder if it is ever going to perform up to par, considering the problems. Is it worth the fix? I'd be out pricing new ones to compare with the cost of replacing parts on this one.
The residue is probably from improper cleaning. If the unit does not drain properly, it is not getting rid of the dirty water from the first cycle before going into the next one. If it turns out to be the drain valve and or pump, you will probably spend half as much for parts as a new DW. Check out www.applianceaid.com for some ideas. and www.repairclinic.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, I had figured out that one but put the posting here in case anyone knew what might cause it to clean properly occasionally: I thought that it might show that there isnt all that much wrong with this unit? If it turns out to be the drain valve and

Pump definitely not worthwhile: Drain valve is something of a question mark to me and there is nothing anywhere on those pages for it on a GSD5930? Which is only about five years old Are there any directions anywhere for checking it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com> wrote in message

I see perfectly good dishwashers offered for free on http://freecycle.org/ or http://www.craigslist.org /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, your point may be a good one, especially where I live; where perfectly good dishwashers only slightly older than mine are put on the street regularly along with a whole rest of the kitchen. The only reason for the 'may be' is that changing a dishwasher isn't an easy business while if the problem is only a clogged drain valve (for instance), unclogging it may be significantly easier if someone can point to instructions as to how to do this.
(A few months ago I saw a Bosch looking brand new outside a building neat my offspring's school: I am making myself feel better by saying that all dishwashers which have been used to clean recently and which have had a housekeeper clean the outside look new. But this one SEEMED to have the interior sticker-tape still on it)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It SEEMS (from a link from one of those pages to pcappliancerepair) that the whole problem on this GSD5930D01WW may have been caused by the central spline in the lower jet becoming clogged and then bursting out. Now the water which does get through (not much of it) does get pushed through to the upper level. Some cleaning of the upper level does take place. Does anyone know how to dissemble the lower rotating arm to put the spline which has come out back in please? I can then clean out the impeller basket and see if THAT solves the not-draining problem?
(The unit does now drain possibly as many as 50% of times I run the dishwasher. It is even possible that the impeller is breaking even olive pips up and pushing them through the drain pipe!)
As far as I can ascertain, this unit doesn't have a drain valve.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Somewhat buoyed by the instructions at http://www.applianceaid.com/WD22X10008.html (which don't work), I did tackle this problem and ended up with a heat gun training on the mid spline which expanded it enough to jam the upper one into it. I suppose time will tell whether the heat and expansion of the plastic (followed by what I presume was the contraction again) will have caused that arm to come off in the future?
I then took out the impeller-area 'filters' and basket and found a troubling point: A third of the holes were entirely blocked by what looked a bit like a transparent algae like substance. HOWEVER the light gray plastic in the matting covering the lower basin of the whole washer seems to be either dissolving or melting and what was blocking the holes were more probably the results of that melting in the heat of the hottest cycle.
Not-so-mysteriously there is no broken off gray plastic matting anywhere to be seen?
Now only about three quarters of an inch of water builds up in the unit after it has finished running (obviously only in the lowest part) and I am wondering if that is normal. If so, this is one curiously designed unit for something which has essentially been on the market for decades with what look like only minor cosmetic modifications.
I did call GE who are supposed to have this super-duper service assistance centre to see if this was a known identified problem and they told me that they are now only a product information and assistance line and referred me to the GE Product Recall line which is 800 804 9802 which only tells you about certain problems and were practically useless with any other problem: They tell you to call 800 432 2737 which has so many even more endless menus and I suspect exists only to make money out of scheduling service calls. Ultimately they transferred me over to the supposed service number which then did the same and transferred me over to what was supposed to be the actual service number. (This goes on endlessly while I was getting on with other business)
GE are now scheduling a service call to ascertain whether there is anything actually wrong with that gray plastic matting
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com> wrote in message

No doubt the appropriate Chinese peasant will receive his beating in due course. Welcome to the 21st century.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Curiously enough I have now had the GE repair people in to look at this unit and they confirm that as is, it does self-destruct after a few years and their technical team are fully aware that you have to have that melting mat changed every 4-5 years. They don't tell you this before the unit has self-destructed of course and now don't want to replace a unit which is obviously 'unfit for purpose'. The repair man now says that they aren't responsible as it CAN be repaired. When he was here, his tune was a bit different.
Then he said that to do the repair would cost $198 but that as it would undoubtedly need a pump eventually when the melted matting caused the pump to seize, putting one in as well would make any repair uneconomical!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.