gauge readings for r-22 on 95 degree day. hi and low side

what should be the normal reading on hi and low side on a 95 degree day
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On 6/14/2013 2:44 PM, onecounty wrote:

Refrigerant?
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Yes. As to which refrigerant, it's in the subject line. Not in the text body, so it's really hard to find information.
Normally, you look at your gages, and check the projected pressures based on superheat and subcooling. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
On 6/14/2013 2:44 PM, onecounty wrote:

day

Refrigerant?
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On Friday, June 14, 2013 4:06:10 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

http://ocad.olivetuniversity.edu
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On 6/14/2013 1:44 PM, onecounty wrote:

You might see 325lbs on the high aide and 70-80lbs on the low side depending on the indoor temperature. ^_^
TDD
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message

With clean coils both inside & outside, an inside temperature of 75 with 50% humidity, I would expect a low side of roughly 70 PSI, and an hi-side pressure of roughly 20-30 above outside ambient temperature (depending on efficiency of unit) which would correspond to 243-278 PSI. Just my opinion....
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On 6/14/2013 4:45 PM, SRN wrote:

You will see that low a liquid line reading on heat pumps which usually have a larger condenser anyway and high SEER R22 units but most of the older R22 systems around here in Alabamastan where Summertime humidity is often 100% will have much higher liquid line pressures. ^_^
TDD
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