Gasoline in the walls...

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Bob F wrote:

True.
We grow old so fast and smart so slow.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Did you really mean halcion days, or halcyon days? Confusing. Halcion is a sleeping pill. Were you asleep when you did that? :-)
--
Walter
www.rationality.net
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Note to self: do not put deodorant on a lighter.
;^)
Eric
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wrote:

Maybe you misread my intent. What I meant was, gasoline is a much more flammable material than ... as a rule. Anything that is made from oil is going to be dangerous in reality. I was probbly too terse there.
Twayne`
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Gentle reminder that gasoline is flammable. It has a flash point lower than 100F. Also, gasoline and air mixtures can be explosive. Sounds like a safety problem, to me.
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Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Well, just a little lower, yeah--about 150F lower, in fact. The flash point isn't of terrible significance here other than that gasoline is, (surprise, surprise!) volatile and flammable...
The ignition temperature is about 500F.
I'll agree this is a bad deal if not just trolling and the advice to call the fire department and expect the contractor to pick up any tab for the resolution.
This could get expensive since the absorption into wallboard, studs, floor, etc., will remain highly flammable for a long period of time even after the most of the vapors are gone may require a significant amount of material be removed and replaced to rid the place from the long term problem...
Only thing I'd think might be beneficial other than ventilation (but as somebody else noted it's spooky to put open electric motor in close proximity for the "boom" factor) _might_ be non-flammable foam to encase it but what the specific product might be I don't know...
This has to be about the stupidest trick I've heard in years...
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But was it an ounce or a quart of gas? Did it go into the nest and the nest was pulled out and the rest was clean?
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Twayne wrote: ...

It was stupid beyond words no matter how much or little--only the consequences might change some.
The chances it went solely on the nest are, imo from the OP's comments, marginally nil...
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You were standing over him the whole time, and let him do it? I would not have allowed it, but it's good to know that anybody would actually try it. Sorry for the mess you have, and I hope it resolves quickly for you.
Cheri
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No, he certainly didn't do it while I was there. At the end of the day before, I had given him a container of wasp spray and watched him use that, but then the next day when I got there, he had already poured gas into the hole. I found out about it when I went into the kitchen and smelled the gas.
In my area, it's VERY common for people to pour gas on a yellow jackets nest; usually when it's in the ground. I've never done it myself, and never would (and I doubt that it's legal), but that's what all of the old-timers do. It's seems pretty stupid to me, though, to pour it into a wall!
I did just realize something, though. When he sprayed wasp spray the night before, I had turned off the breaker to that GFI outlet, but then turned it back on later that evening so that he could use the outlet for his tools (the spray said it was non-conductive, anyway). So when he poured gas into the hole the next day, he was pouring it into a LIVE outlet!
The more I think about it, I'm just shocked that my house is still here.
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Call the Fire Department. They will call in there hazardous materials team. The only truly safe thing to do is to remove all of the contaminated building materials. The effect of the gasoline on the insulation of the wiring would be major concern of mine. Lets see. We have a small amount of gasoline spilled in a confined space. If the vapor mixture is in the flammable range and the deteriorated insulation leads to an arc... One cup of gasoline mixed with the right amount of air has the explosive brisance of a stick of dynamite. -- Tom Horne
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This is kind of my thought, too; that we'll have to cut out all of the contaminated wood. The thing is, though, that I KNOW this guy doesn't have the money to pay for it. I could sue him, of course, but even a judgement doesn't do any good; he doesn't have a regular wage to garnish, and he's a 60 year old man that's never going to sell his house.
So, this repair will come out of my own pocket, no matter how I cut it.
I think that I'll call the fire department tomorrow and have their inspector to come out. I really hate to do that, because I can already feel that he's going to require me to fix it, and I simply don't have the money... but I don't have the money for my house to burn down, either!
For anyone that cares, I let the contractor go this morning. All he had left was the handrails, anyway, and I'll just do that on my own this weekend.
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Jason Carlton wrote:

Did your contractor have insurance? If not, maybe you can get some relief from your own insurer.They can take him to court.
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wrote:

You have a hazmat site now. The contractor needs to clean his mess if he wants to stay out of jail.
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I think what I'd do is call the non-emergency number for your fire department and explain your situation. In this case, with such a stupid contractor, they may not have heard of such a thing, but they should be able to help you assess the risk.
Keith
Jason Carlton wrote:

I think what I'd do is call the non-emergency number for your fire department and explain your situation. In this case, with such a stupid contractor, they may not have heard of such a thing, but they should be able to help you assess the risk. I've had gas on clothes before, and that smell doesn't go away for a long time. It might be most expedient to create an opening so you can get at the source and treat it directly.
Keith
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