Gasoline fume detection

Page 2 of 2  
Doug Miller writes:

I stand by what I said. The hazard is in sudden aspiration of a significant quantity causing pneumonia. Not by swallowing into the stomach, nor in inhaling minor vapor concentrations into the lungs. Suffocation from high-concentration vapors is possible, but this is due to oxygen displacement and not poisoning.
Gasoline is dangerous, but not the way most people think. They see "harmful or fatal if swallowed" and wrongly assume it acts like, say, methanol, to poison biochemically via the bloodstream.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nobody disputed that anyway: everyone knows that inhaling gasoline is harmful.

Unfortunately you haven't yet figured out that swallowing it is, too.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller writes:

Sez you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My, what a witty retort. I haven't heard that one since, maybe, fourth grade.
It's pretty apparent, given your absurd claims, that you haven't figured that out yet. You _explicitly_stated_ that gasoline hydrocarbons were safe to drink, remember? That's how this argument started: you wrote that gasoline hydrocarbons were "pretty harmless" and that they could even be drunk, and I said that's bullshit. It was then, and it still is.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller writes:

Yes, and I cited a leading medical authority (Merck Manual) explaining that the hazard is aspiration pneumonia incidental to swallowing, not the swallowing per se. You are free to cite otherwise.
Better yet, offer me money. I will drink a hydrocarbon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You provided a citation showing that aspiration of gasoline hydrocarbons is dangerous (which nobody disuputes), *not* a citation showing that drinking them is safe.
Any MSDS for those hydrocarbons will show otherwise.

No, thank you. I'd prefer not to have the consequences on my conscience. I'd be satisfied if you simply dropped this stupid claim.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Tell you what, you just keep drinking gasoline for lunch, and the rest of us won't. that should work out well for everyone.
oh, and stop smoking.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Fearn wrote:

If you can smell it, it isn't good, you need fresh air ventilation. If you can see the leaking of gasoline on the floor, you have too much in the air so you need to fix the motorcycles or put them elsewhere, for safety and health reasons. It probably won't kill you right away, but if you keep breathing low levels for a period of time you could develop severe asthma and you don't want that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George E. Cawthon writes:

Don't be squeamish. Limits of detectibility are always much lower than limits of acceptable industrial exposure, even by strict OSHA standards.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George E. Cawthon wrote:

The explosion may get you before the fumes do. Gasoline is toxic to most of the organs in your body - brain, liver, kidneys, etc.
Got a space heater in the garage? Ever do work that produces sparks? Plug in a tool that may produce sparks?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I worked in my dad's gas station for many years as a kid in the 50s. Before the automatic hose shutoffs, we had to listen to the sound of the splashing to hear when the tank was getting full. That meant the ears and face were down right next to the filler tube and of course we had to keep breathing, and the smell of the vapors was unusual but not unpleasant. Tomorrow, I'll be 62 years of age and - knock wood, I'm still in good health! Maybe I was just lucky and then again, maybe the fumes are not as harmful as they are now made out to be!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.