gasoline for lawnmower

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On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 20:10:17 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

High Octane fuel, burns slower than low octane and when used in a typical low compression lawnmower engine will cause excessive carbon buildup. That is a FACT.
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It is my understanding on smaller engines the 92 octane is a far too rich to be used perhaps causing the engine to run too hot? And in my area finding the ethanol-free gas is getting extremely difficult.
If you RTFM, on most small engines, 87 octane is the highest recommended. But who reads those? Now, I said MOST. That does not mean ALL. If you have any doubt, just look in that little paper manual that came with the machine. Remember that? No. Oh, well, you can download one.
Steve
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wrote:

Rich? Please define what you mean by rich.

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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Rich as in someone paid too much for it.
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On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 19:27:54 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

What small engine book suggests a higher octane?
It will burn hot (92), damage the spark plug and maybe internal parts like rings or pistons or warp a valve. (prolonged use)
87 octane for a small engines.
I put 87 octane in my truck. My mower can run on the same - it's not special, nor deserves 92 octane.
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Are you a mechanic? A small engine mechanic? or an engine designer?
I'm not the latter, but both of the first two. High octane is not required by most small engines, but is NOT damaging to use. The only reason I recommend premium fuel, and in particular, in Canada, SHELL premium, is because SHELL has gone on record in Canada as guaranteeing there is NO ETHANOL in their premium fuel.
Years ago, with leaded fuel, there WAS an issue with using premium leaded fuel in small engines (and air cooled engines in general) due to lead accumulation on valves and valve stems causing valves to stick. Sticking valves overheat. In aircraft engines (which I am also familiar with) designed for the old 87 octane fuel (no longer made) agressive leaning (lean of peak EGT) is required to keep lead buildup from causing "morning sickness" - or sticking valves on startup when using LL100, the universally available AvGas of today.
Lead buildup was the only thing that would damage spark plugs due to running premium fuel - and again, that is no longer an issue..
The other advantage of using higher octane fuel in air-cooled engines is you are MUCH less likely to destroy a piston due to detonation in the event you do overheat the engine under load. Not usually an issue with "L" head engines, but possible with today's higher compression OHV engines.
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On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 20:21:06 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'm not from Canuckistan, in Nevadatuckey I use 87 octane.
YMMV
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On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 20:21:06 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Actually, it is quite damaging. It causes excessive carbon buildup which requires an expensive engine tear down to fix. It may even lead to cylinder scoring and broken rings, inaddition to valve damage.
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Oren wrote:

I am pretty sure that my Stihl chainsaw calls for gasoline with an octane rating of greater than 87. I'm not sure if it calls for 89 or 92 octane.
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wrote:

Sorry. I was *meaning* "lawnmower" the OP mentioned.
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wrote:

high octane fuel. My partner would likely run on kerosine
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wrote:

Let us know when you find out. As has been pointed out, the recommendation for 87 octane applies to MOST small equipment engines. You may have one of the few exceptions. What model is your saw?
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On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 19:27:54 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Lawnmowers run much better with 87 Octane than 92. High Octane gas is only an advantage in engines designed for it. On your other point... I don't think you can buy ethanol free 87 Octane gasoline in the U.S.
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On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 20:50:25 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

reason to use it - but I have NEVER noticed an engine running more poorly on 93 octane than on 87 - and I've owned a lot of cars that specified regular gas that DID run better on premium - some so much better that the increased fuel economy more than paid the difference in cost - back in the day when premium was only $0.05 a gallon more than the low octane stuff.
And if that 87 octane in your lawn mower is 5 - 10% ethanol and has sat for a week in 90% humidity, the ethanol free 93 will run a WHOLE LOT better.
I had a few gallons of old av-gas (100LL - about 3 times as much lead as the old Sunoco 260) removed from a friend's plane when he did his annual - and the Briggs 5 horse on my old lawn mower just loved it. So did my chain-saw. I would not use it on a regular basis because the lead could cause issues - but the higher octane and lower vapour pressure didn't hurt the performance of either one at all.
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I did meet a long haul driver who told me his family mini van ran poorly on 93 octane. Chevy Astro, I want to say. The dealership guys suggested he go back to 87, which worked much better.
My Dad used to run 93 octane in the old lawn mower (Tecumseh, from 20 years or so ago) and it always worked fine. Don't remember if he ran it dry.
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On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 06:50:14 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Switching to a different brand would likely have done the same. - depending on the problem. A lot of American gas uses ethanol to increase the octane - and THAT can make an engine complain because ethanol has roughly half the fuel value gasoline has - and it absorbs water too, making the mixture even leaner yet.

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On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 00:05:08 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

For someone who claims to be a professional mechanic, you sure don't know much about engines. You are pretty good at making up your own fantasies about them.
Using 92 Octane gasoline in small engines where 87 Octane is specified WILL cause problems. That is a FACT. You don't seem to understand the difference between low and high Octane gasoline.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

You can and it would typically be at an independent station. But the government increased the subsidies earlier this year so it wholesales for less than the good stuff. I know of a local owner who has two stations that each do 14,000+ gallons of fuel sales/day. He doesn't like the idea of ethanol. But the government increased the amount of money they pull out of our pockets to subsidize it so now it is artificially cheaper than quality gasoline. The big box places immediately jumped on it and lowered their prices. He can't afford to not do it so he is converting both plazas to ethanol blend. Typical big box race to the bottom.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Higher Octane = higher ignition temperature. It is called for to prevent 'knocking' in high-compression engines. Unless you have a high-performance, high-compression engine (such as a race care or Lamborghini), higher Octane ratings mean higher prices and nothing else.
A high-octane fuel does not contain more energy than a lower-octane competitor, it only burns slower. For small engines (lawnmowers, leaf-blowers, marital aids), a slow-burning (i.e., 90+ Octane) fuel is not the fuel of choice.
For your car, on your next empty, put in five gallons of 87 Octane. If the engine doesn't knock at higher speeds or when accelerating, you can thereafter save $2.00 or more each fill-up.
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wrote:

FALSE
ANd not necessarily true. There are many high octane fuels that burn as fast or faster than many low octane fuels.

On some cars. On others the computer adjusts for the low octane fuel, retarding the timing and increasing the amount of fuel burned so you save a lot less than you think you will.

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