Gasoline engine driven chain saw recommendation

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Need a gasoline engine driven chain saw around 22-24 inches. Any first hand recommendations?
Thanks
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Three, in order of their quality
1. Stihl 2. Johnserand (mostly European) 3. Husqvarna
HTH, and good luck. Don't cheap out on a cheap saw. You can fix and maintain Stihl and Husky's from a common supplier. So long as you don't screw up the gas mix and run it without enough oil, the other problems are nuts and bolts. When you do go buy a good saw, you will have a $200 boat anchor. Don't listen to those who tell you Echo and Poulan and such are good saws. If you use it at all, you will burn it up, and be in the market for a REAL saw.
Learn how to take the bar off regularly, and clean it with a blowgun and parts washer to keep the bar oiler working, and "stuff" out of the centrifugal clutch. Keep your blades sharp, getting them professionally sharpened, or buy a good Oregon sharpener. It will make all the difference in the world.
If you start off with a cheapie off brand saw .................... Happy boating.
Steve
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Hmmmm....my Poulan has been working fine since I bought it in 2004.
Guess I got a lemon.
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wrote:

There ARE different levels of Poulan product. I believe one is "poulan pro" - which is a HALF decent product. There cutesy mass market CRAP isn't anywhere close to decent.
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On Sep 14, 7:22 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Poulan Wood Shark from Home Depot.
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On 9/14/2011 4:06 PM, Ron wrote:

has it cut 20 to 40 cords of hedge (osage orange) per year? or just pruned redbuds in the fall?
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Steve Barker
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I'm guessing that poulan has got cobwebs on it.
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Nope. Gets used when I need it and works fine. And I've cut shit that I really shouldn't have with only a 14" bar. I EXPECTED it to crap out by now, but it hasn't.
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wrote:

The 14 inch bar has likely saved the rest of it.
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Nope. Gets used when I need it and works fine. And I've cut shit that I really shouldn't have with only a 14" bar. I EXPECTED it to crap out by now, but it hasn't.
reply: Well, the OP DID request suggestions for a MUCH larger saw. Does Poulan make 22-24" versions? Anyone here have a 22-24" Poulan that has lasted any length of time?
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Nope. Gets used when I need it and works fine. And I've cut shit that I really shouldn't have with only a 14" bar. I've EXPECTED it to crap out by now, but it hasn't.
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I bought it to cut up 2 oak trees that fell when Hurricane Charley came through in '04. I bought a Home Depot brand (Homelite) at first that crapped out halfway through the first tree. So returned it for the Poulan.
Since then it has been used to cut up 2 more fallen oak trees (neighbors trees) from storms.
It gets used once a year to prune 4 trees.
I used it a few months ago to cut up a LOT of 2x6s and 4x4s for a friend of mine. He was removing a "gazebo" and a pool deck that was built around an above ground pool.
AFA as hedges, I use a hedge cutter for those. And I have no clue what "osage orange" is.
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wrote:

From what I remember, it is "hard"
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I bought it to cut up 2 oak trees that fell when Hurricane Charley came through in '04. I bought a Home Depot brand (Homelite) at first that crapped out halfway through the first tree. So returned it for the Poulan.
Since then it has been used to cut up 2 more fallen oak trees (neighbors trees) from storms.
It gets used once a year to prune 4 trees.
I used it a few months ago to cut up a LOT of 2x6s and 4x4s for a friend of mine. He was removing a "gazebo" and a pool deck that was built around an above ground pool.
AFA as hedges, I use a hedge cutter for those. And I have no clue what "osage orange" is.
reply: Take it out and cut six cords of plain pine and get back to us.
Steve
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On 9/15/2011 7:25 AM, Ron wrote:

http://www.gpnc.org/osage.htm
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Steve Barker
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<snip>
The wood is strong and so dense that it will neither rot nor succumb to the attacks of termites or other insects for decades. The trees also found use as an effective component of windbreaks and shelterbelts.
<snip>
No doubt you would need a high end chainsaw to prune a row of those every year.
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Hmmmm....my Poulan has been working fine since I bought it in 2004.
Guess I got a lemon.
reply: I've heard a hell of a lot more stories from people who have tossed Poulan, Echo, and McCulloch chain saws than Stihl or Huskys. Yes, you got a lemon. The factory designs them to fail within a short time. Either that, or you did not use it much, and stuck to the directions pretty well.
Why is it that I NEVER see any Poulans on those logger TV shows? Or see a professional arborist with a Poulan?
Steve
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Well, I'm not a logger. I don't use it professionally either. It get used once or twice a year and works well for my needs.
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Because the pro's don't want to climb 60' up a tree only to have some cheap piece-of-shit chainsaw stall out/break?
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If you know how to sharpen with just a file, why make it complicated and more expense? The last time I went wood cutting, I was trying to get together a 28' toyhauler, four ATVs, and all that go with that for a five day trip. Having the chains sharpened at Ace for $16 was a no brainer. That being said, I don't mind fiddling with sharpening them myself when I have the time. They do work sweet when sharpened professionally, but I question the amount of metal taken off, and whether it shortens the life of the chain. To sharpen them on a really good sharpener, it seems you cut some metal off every tooth, even the ones that don't need any taken off. And I see it operated like a chop saw. What about the round surface? It seems that is not touched.
Whatever winds yer clock, I guess. I found the best thing you can do is keep it out of the dirt........... DAMHIKT
Steve
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