gasolene for small engines

Page 1 of 2  
If I use high octane gasolene w/o alcohol in my small engines is it ok not to use any of the various stablizers? How long will the high octane be safe to use w/o the stabilizer?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 2 Sep 2014 03:15:28 -0700 (PDT), Frank Thompson

    Maybe you could specify what "my small engines" is ?     Model cars, lawnmower, saw ?     []'s     
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/2/2014 6:15 AM, Frank Thompson wrote:

various stablizers? How long will the high octane be safe to use w/o the stabilizer?

A couple decades ago, we used to have trouble with gasoline going stale, long before the mandated ethanol.
So, I'd think stabilizer is a good idea. Unsure the time frame, probably six months to a year.
I've had moment when an engine was needed, had been stored with old gasoline. this being 1999 or so, before ethanol was mandated. Honda generator, and needed for a power cut. The engine started after a spray of ether on the air filter, and then it ran fine after that. The fellow wanted to put in new gas, so he sent his son for gas. The only place that had electricity for the pumps was far distance, and big line of cars waiting to buy gas.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, September 2, 2014 7:59:14 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

+1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/2/2014 8:21 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Thanks, young fellah.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank Thompson wrote, on Tue, 02 Sep 2014 03:15:28 -0700:

Not sure where you are, but, in the states, we measure the anti-knock rating using a combination of the research and motor method, and then average the two, to come up with the anti-knock index, e.g., 87AKI.
It's rare for a small engine, I think, in the USA, to be designed for a great anti-knock index than that "Regular". As you know, putting a gasoline of higher anti-knock qualities than designed into *any* engine which is both already running properly & not subject to excessive heat and/or loads, can provide absolutely no positive value.
Summarizing that as saying that the octane rating is designed into the engine and most "small engines" are designed for 87AKI here in the states, why would you even *want* to put gasoline whose flame front moves slower (so to speak) into an engine, unless it's designed for such fuels?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 2 Sep 2014 14:13:05 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

He is not concerned about octane ratings. If you read the post, you'd see he mentioned it has no ethanol. Many small engines have long term problems with ethanol and many of us are using gas without it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It should be good for atleast 6 months.
No more than I use, I still get the gas without the ethanol and put in the Stabil. That way I don't wory about it.
I have 3 of the 5 gallon containers and when two get empty I take them and refill. Before I leave the house I put in the required ammount of Stabil. I have a 5 kw generator that I start every couple of weeks, cahin saw may sit for a long time and I never know when I may need to add some more gas to the tank , so by having the stabil in all the gas I don't worry. I probably average using about 2 gallons of gas a week. That would make my gas staying around for 5 or so weeks in the summer, and lots longer in the winter as from about Novermber to March I don't mow so the gas is not usually used during that time.
--
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

And some of us are lucky enough to have more than one local vendor for non-eth gas . I find it interesting that the town of less than 3,000 population where I live has non-eth available at multiple outlets , yet a city of near a million <Memphis Tn> doesn't have a single one ...
--
Snag



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/02/2014 11:03 AM, Terry Coombs wrote: ...

That's owing to the emission requirements to meet ozone and other pollution limits are much more stringent in the higher-population areas owing simply to there being so many more sources in a confined area. W/o the NOx-reduction of the ethanol blends, places like Memphis would exceed those limits routinely and that costs them big bucks in loss of federal dollars...
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The use of ethanol is mandated in some regions due to pollution and air quality. Much of the areas are high population and lots of traffic. That is an advantage of a small town far from the interstates and congestion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 2 Sep 2014 14:13:05 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

premium is available without ethanol. Ethanol can cause problems in seasonal small engines. Using high octane fuel will NOT cause problems on these engines, whether 2 stroke, L-Head or OHV. And you do not undersdtand octane.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in news:3hsb0a5kbuvpf72lhirv9d8niaqf9b6ukq@ 4ax.com:

There is so very much that Danny-Boi doesn't understand.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Zaky Waky wrote, on Tue, 02 Sep 2014 17:22:28 +0000:

I apologize for missing the part about the ethanol being important, and *not* the octane rating.
However, looking back at the OP that Frank Thompson wrote:

Since the octane rating of the fuel is *higher* than the engine was designed for, we can *remove* the octane rating from the equation!
The original question more appropriately becomes: If I use ... gasoline w/o alcohol in my small engines is it ok not to use any of the various stabilizers? How long will the ... gasoline be safe to use w/o the stabilizer?
The first sentence merely becomes almost meaningless, because all he is asking is whether gasoline without alcohol is "ok" without stabilizers. Since the engines were most likely designed with gasoline without alcohol in mind, then of course they can be used without stabilizers. Even if they were designed for fuels with alcohol in mind, they can *still* be used without stabiliers.
So, the first sentence is almost meaningless since neither the octane rating nor the dearth of alcohol has anything to do with the engine, in practice.     
So, the only question that matters is how long gasoline lasts in the can before it "needs" stabilizers,and, this question has been hashed to death already.
Nobody really can give a definite time, and it matters greatly what the storage (and weather) conditions are, but months is an appropriate gross time frame.
Anyway, I do apologize for not realizing the alcohol was the key concept, and not the octane. However when you correct for the fact the octane rating can't possibly have any effect on an engine which wasn't knocking in the first place, and that the octane rating has nothing to do with stabilization, then you get a different initial question.
The initial question merely turns into a question of how long gasoline lasts before it needs stabilizers, and the answer varies, but it in terms of months.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/3/14, 3:01 PM, Danny D. wrote:

draws moisture, and that gums up carburetors and engines. In particular, if there is any venting of a gas can or gas tank, water will accumulate, depending on the humidity level and temperature fluctuations.
When the water content reaches 3/4 ounce per gallon, water and ethanol will start to drop to the bottom. Besides causing corrosion and varnish, it can wreck a 2-cycle engine because the water-ethanol doesn't have oil.
They recommend shaking before you pour. I can imagine another solution. Store your gas can tilted so any water-ethanol is along one side of the bottom. Draw gas with a siphon pump whose tube doesn't quite reach the bottom. When the can is nearly empty, pour the remaining gas into a jar and see if any water-ethanol settles.
I remember when it was common to see a little jar along a fuel line, so you could drain any water that settled.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 2 Sep 2014 03:15:28 -0700 (PDT), Frank Thompson

You mean like Sta-bil?
By alcohol you mean ethanol?
I have never heard that ethanol had anaything to do with the need for Sta-bil, and I remember that gas got old, wouldn't start cars, etc. and maybe even clogged carburetors long before ethanol was in use.
That's what sta-bil was meant to overcome and afaict, it does a good job, so you should use it. If you use a lot, maybe you can buy it for less in big containers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

makes it deteriotate faster (due to oxidation). Stabilizers are more critical in ethanol enhanced fuels - and generally a different stabilizer is recommended. Fresh Non ethanol fuel, stored in a sealed container in a is generally safe for at least 6 months without stabilizer. Left in an open (vented) tank or carburetor cut that time in half.
I generally store both my lawn mower and snowblower with the carb drained and the tank full of Shell Premium and have absolutely no problem starting next season.. My old snowblower did not have a fuel shutoff, so I could not drain the carb without running the tank dry - and it was always a bit of work to get it started the first couple of times -sometimes had to take the carb apart.
The chainsaw has a totally sealed (pressurized) tank - started just fine after 2 full years not being used. (again, NO ethanol)
Old lawn tractor left sitting in a friend's driving shed for 2 years, the gas STUNK and the carb was all gummed up - regular unleaded (ethanol) gas.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/3/2014 9:44 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've found that hydroxide based oven cleaner does a nice job for cleaning green carb parts. Dissemble, put the parts in a spaghetti strainer. Spray, wait a minute or two. Rinse, dry. Spin cycle not recommended. Parts get lost. Ha, ha.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stormin Mormon wrote:

I just let all small engines run dry at the end of season. Store them in tool shed. At the start of season fill tank up with fresh fuel, ~5 pulls it starts and run. Been doing this as long as I remember, no serious problem. Of course I am crazy about regular PM. Feel, Inspect, Tighten, Clean, Adjust, Lubricate. An old Chinese saying, "No trouble, if you prepare ahead".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/4/2014 4:02 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Now, that's a new acronym for me. Fictal. I may use that some time.
"So, lawn mower shop? I want a fictal for my mower."
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.