Gas water heater water shut off. Will it work?

The water heater is leaking slowly so I've turned off the inlet valve to prevent complete disaster. Can I turn it back on, take a shower, and turn it off again? Will it keep heating if the valve is off and no water is flowing through it? I can't think of any reason it won't work. I guess I'll find out tomorrow morning.
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.

Yes the gas will continue to heat the water. The gas valve is not connected to any water sensor. (normally that is.)
But PLEASE double check the over presure valve is operational.
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I thought the gas was turned on and off by a temp sensor on the side of the tank. So, a dry water tank would not end up turning off the flame, as the heat might not make it back to the sensor.
If the tank remains full of water, then it's OK.
--

Christopher A. Young
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"Phil-In-Mich." < snipped-for-privacy@not-want-spam.net> wrote in message
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if someone uses all flex lines give some thought to securing the tank so it cant fall over. most tanks around here are held in place by their lines, in earthquake areas they must be strapped to the building somehow.
saw a all flex install once, i told the homeowner who had a small child it was a hazard
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A half inch solid copper pipe won't usually add much stability either. If you're worried about stability, they need to be properly strapped.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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Water being 8.35 pounds a galon, you think something holds it in place, in addition to a flimsy flex line?
--

Christopher A. Young
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< snipped-for-privacy@aol.com> wrote in message
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the
You "thought"... You never cease to amaze me with your stupidity.
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If you don't have an expansion tank, it could make the leak much worse by increasing the tank pressure. At the least, it will probably cause releases from the safety valve.
Bob
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wrote:

No, I don't think there is an expansion tank. So I took the safe way and turned it off. Shut off the water and shut off the gas. I can get away with that for now since the Significant Other won't be back until the weekend. Plus, it's just short of heating season. Having followed the pipes a bit, I see that the furnace gets its water from the hot water outlet of the water heater. I think that's cheating but that's how it is and, I guess, how it should be. But I couldn't pull this off in another month.
I'll shower in the gym when I get home in the evening until then and do without hot water otherwise. Maybe I'll even work out a bit.
If I can't get someone to install a new water heater within a few days, cheaply, I'll do it myself. I may just do it anyway. This does not look like rocket science and I think I can get away without having to solder - which is definitely my weak point.
Both the hot and cold water pipes are connected by what appears to be a union, a big (2" maybe) hexagonal ring connecting two smaller hexagonal rings. It looks like I just use a big wrench and turn it one way (or the other!). Assuming I can figure out which way, that should disconnect the existing one.
According to what I read, I can use a flex connector for both hot and cold pipes on the new heater, which should make life much easier.
The gas line presents a similar situation. There is a smaller union connecting the mess of pipes that was necessary without a flex connector, but there are now flex gas connectors as well. I'll have to check if that's legal in NYC but if not I can jury-rig the same crap as is currently there.
No electric to deal with as far as I can tell. That's sort of surprising to me but that's how it is.
The venting should be a 1" rise per 4 feet, but is almost straight right now. I will NOT be ripping holes in the side of the house to change the connection to the chimney but I will see if I can get a slightly lower water heater so the rise is better.
What's the big deal otherwise? It really looks simple. I'm sure it won't be this easy, but it looks doable.
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When you turn off the water heater, the water will still stay hot for a long time, for longer than 24 hours, assuming you don't use it, or at least don't use a lot, like for taking a shower. So, no reason you can't turn it back on periodically. Just move the gas control between pilot and on.

Assuming it's copper, I'd much rather just cut the two lines and avoid unions, which IMO are just another potential source of problems with leaks. And unless the new unit is exactly the same height, etc as the old one, you're liklely going to have to do some soldering anyway. I'd go get a piece of copper pipe and a few cheap fittings and practice. The keys are making sure there is no water in the pipes, get the pipes and fittings both perfectly clean (best to buy the brush type cleaners, one that goes inside the fitting and one that goes around the pipe), apply flux, Buy a tubing cutter too. Then just apply heat and when you think it's hot enough, just touch the solder to the joint. If it does easily melt, it's not hot enough. When it is the solder should easily melt, flow around the joint, and get wicked into it. When done, you can wipe it quickly with a rag so it looks nice too.

Yes, you probably can use them if you want to. Here in NJ, I haven't seen them used, at least not in new construction houses that I've been looking at.

When I replaced mine, the new one had the gas connection at exactly the same height/location as the old one. It may be that most of them are.

Std ones have no electric. But I think the high efficiency direct vent ones may have a blower for the exhaust? Not sure on this, but you most likely want one that will use the existing chimney.

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On Tue, 23 Oct 2007 03:52:51 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:
..

There goes another reason to go to the gym.

...
But everything seems threaded from before the union; the only soldering is a few feet away. I'll look again when I get home.
I should practice my soldering technique anyway I guess. Just in case I need it. Ah, wonderful internet. I see exactly how to do a good soldering job. Like you say, it's all in the preparation.
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That's only true if there is some type of backflow preventer in the system, which most homes don't have. If you just have a straight connection to municipal water or a well tank, there is nothing blocking the water flow, so pressure remains the same and there is no need for an expansion tank.
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If you shut off the tank inlet valve, and have no hot faucets open, all flow out of the tank is blocked. Doesn't matter whether you're on well or municipal, nor whether there's backflow preventers or not.
Think of the valve as an "anyflow" preventer.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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All you have to do is open/close the water valve. When doing that, make sure you turn the water heater gas control to the pilot position. When you want to take a shower, open the water valve and turn the control back to on, wait a bit, then take your shower. The pilot burning on an empty tank won't hurt anything.
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sure
want
wait
hurt
Turn the gas control to pilot, not off. This will leave the pilot burning, but will not operate the main burner.
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