Gas vs. Electric Dryer

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On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 11:56:40 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@bean.rochester.rr.com wrote:

Not here in northern PA either - our climate is similar to yours.
For that matter, I used to live in very seriously cold country - Edmonton, Alberta, CA. Gas lines there didn't freeze up either. Night-time temps of -30 to -40 (F or C - take your pick, it's not much different in that range) were common in Edmonton when we lived there.
Pat
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right Wade 40 years ago a house blew up , maybe arson? It is rare.. Every day there are elec fires. especialy in the winter. this guy who says elec is safer than gas is wrong its also for 90% of us a ripoff. Our elec co. years ago ,in an area of 3million would give away, and install, free, electric furnaces, because they would make their money back fast. Earthquake zone ? maybe. but gas would be banned.for new const. Freeze no. Apts no gas? Cost instalation issue. I lived in one ,never again utilites killed me, There is one thing noboby has considered , Using elec. dryer in winter and not venting produced heat.. I saw a product on one tv home show, years ago, you put your elec dryer on , A box with filter and winter- summer valve, If BTU similar , [only for a few] would be a smart idea. Gas is used to make elec for a majority of U.S . conversion costs.. I took out my elec water heater saved 75% on water heat For me gas.
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All the houses on a street blew up. Yep, sounds like arson to me.
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Pat Meadows wrote in message ...

Oh for heaven's sake. Natural gas is a mixture of compounds, (methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, etc.). Natural gas boils at minus 263 degrees F. Methane, the principle component of natural gas (around 94% of the total by volume), freezes at minus 296.5 degrees F. Precise temperatures will vary with the proportions of the various components.
Can natural gas lines freeze? Not in any climate found on Earth.
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On 23 Jun 2003 23:02:52 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Eastward Bound) wrote:

fear-monger much?
--
BRENT - The Usenet typo king. :)

Fast Times At Ridgemont High Info http://www.FastTimesAtRidgemontHigh.org
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Bob Ward wrote:

The spamnographers summer job is repairing porches
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If you do a search on gas dryers you will find some good sites.
I was going run a line across my house and put in a gas dryer, but then found out I would save less than $50 a year. Couldn't justify that. Electric dryer just aren't as bad as I thought.
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BrianEWilliams wrote in message

New dryers aren't required to display energy guide labels (in the US anyway, I don't know about elsewhere) so judging operating costs isn't as easy as it is for, say, washers.
However, except in extremely unusual circumstances, heat from burning gas just has to be cheaper than heat from electricity, so you can expect operating costs for a gas dryer to be less than those for a comparable electric model. The question is, how much cheaper?
Columbia Gas of Ohio (hardly an unbiased source) has a page http://www.columbiagasohio.com/home/products/drying.asp ) showing how much less gas drying can cost in various parts of it's service area. I have no idea how accurate the data presented are, or how representative of your area this page may be.

I don't know about maintenance issues, but...a year or two ago (or was it longer) an apartment building near Philadelphia burned because of heavy rains. Water flooded the laundry room, the dryers started to float, which broke the connections with the gas lines, which released gas into the structure, which was set off by some spark or other, and kaboom.
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Unless we (USA) have a mild Summer *and* a mild Winter, we may see an explosion in NG prices.
Natural Gas Crisis by Dale Allen Pfeiffer
Copyright 2003, From The Wilderness Publications, www.copvcia.com. All Rights Reserved. May be reprinted, distributed or posted on an Internet web site for non-profit purposes only.
June 23, 2003, 2000 PDT (FTW) --Forget about terrorists. Don't give another thought to SARS. The single greatest threat to the U.S. right now comes from a critical shortage of natural gas. The impending crisis will affect all consumers directly in the pocket book, and it may well mean that some people won't survive next winter. The problem is not with wells or pumps. The problem is that North America is running out and there is no replacement supply. [.....] Rising NG prices have also led to an increase in Nitrogen fertilizer costs, which use NG as a feedstock. Nitrogen fertilizer is now selling for in excess of 55% more than it sold for a year ago. Natural Gas accounts for 70 to 80% of the cost of such fertilizers. Southern farmers also face higher irrigation expenses, as NG is used to run irrigation pumps. [.....] It is almost a certainty that there will be a Natural Gas crisis this year, and you will not have to wait until winter to see it begin. Prices are already beginning to move upward. By the end of August NG prices will probably be back in the $8.00-$10.00/MMbtu range, and possibly higher. Such prices for summer are unheard of, and there is no telling how it will affect the market, or our electric bills. [.....] In the worst case, there would be many stories of people freezing in their homes. Prices would skyrocket. The chemical and fertilizer industry would be sent reeling. Overall, industry would slow down drastically and the economy would suffer. Come the summer of 2004, farmers would go out of business and the price of food would likely begin to climb. And the task of refilling storage in 2004 would be even more daunting than it is this year.
http://tinyurl.com/f8d9
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Albert Wagner wrote in message

I've had two gas stoves (both in rented apartments) and an aunt had one for her whole adult life, that had no need of electricity. You lit the burners and the oven with a pilot light, or a match. No oven light bulb, no clock on the stove, nothing electrical at all. Not all gas appliances require electricity. Or at least, not all gas appliances always did.
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ok guys,,, think ,,, wake up,,, your insurance co knows...... that is what they do . Punch numbers.....your rates dont go up for gas......call the guys that pay out everyday for all claims, ..... GAS is safe , so is Elec. when maintained..... nuff said....... New Subject......WHO is MY LOWLIFE CLOAN IMPOSTER , all takers but cloan
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Why? for What? Now who in the hell are you talking at, you stupid fuck? Will you ever use any usenet accepted protocol, or will you always be just a webtv shit stain?
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Gas prices always rise during heating season, while electrical is regulated by the government. But i would still go with gas because it is just better for drying clothes, IMHO.
BrianEWilliams wrote:

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Be careful about generalized statements like this; this particular one is not universally true. In Massachusetts, for example, both electricity and natural gas rates are regulated by the government, in the sense that the utilities need to get permission from the regulatory authorities before raising rates, but the authorities rarely reject a rate increase when it is legitimately due to increased fossil-fuel costs.
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On Fri, 27 Jun 2003 12:11:00 +0000 (UTC) snipped-for-privacy@kamens.brookline.ma.us (Jonathan Kamens) wrote:

I think that regulation enters into the picture when the gas crosses state lines. Not suprisingly, gas is typically more expensive in gas producing states.
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Why do you say that? Most regulation of utility pricing is at the state level, not the Federal level. State regulatory authorities don't care whether the gas/electricity cross state lines.
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On Fri, 27 Jun 2003 13:58:34 +0000 (UTC) snipped-for-privacy@kamens.brookline.ma.us (Jonathan Kamens) wrote: <snip>

Google on FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) for articles like this:
"Recent analyses of the natural gas market, 1 including those of the Department of Energy (DOE), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), 2 and the State of Louisiana, 3 conclude that there is a serious problem of regional gas supply imbalance in which most intrastate pipelines are at a disadvantage in competing with most interstate pipelines for new gas supplies. In addition to this supply imbalance, there is a related problem of price disparity. Most intrastate pipelines must pay prices for old gas supplies substantially higher than the prices interstate pipelines must pay for such supplies. Analysts predict that the twin problems of supply imbalance and price disparity between the interstate and intrastate markets will grow worse over the next five to ten years unless Congress passes legislation to avoid this result. Louisiana is particularly disadvantaged by the present situation because of its heavy reliance on intrastate suppliers of natural gas."
http://www.dnr.state.la.us/SEC/EXECDIV/TECHASMT/lep/legal/001.htm
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On Fri, 27 Jun 2003 04:30:18 -0500, someone wrote:

Read it, carefully. Looks like this:
1) There is an price disparity.
2) There is *not* a regulation to stop this, the author is saying that a regulation is needed to prevent this.
3) It is not clear from the above excerpt alone, that the *reason* for the disparity is a present reg, rather than old contracts.
Sure, there is an FERC, and it has many roles, and some of its roles have changed over the years, particularly as to now reduced regulation of natural gas. Its not my field. Maybe you have info, but tell us more. The above quote only tells us there is a disparity in price and that some pipelines are at a competitive disadvantage. But why?
-v.
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Natar gas rate in my area have skyrocketed in in GA where I live since deregulation . Electric rates still a regulated . I am pretty sure that owning a gas clothes dryer in GA is no longer a cost savings with respect ot energy cost .
On 23 Jun 2003 07:15:25 -0700, sorry_no snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (BrianEWilliams) wrote:

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