Gas vs. Electric Dryer

Page 1 of 5  
We are buying a new construction townhouse. Installing a gas line to the laundry area will be $100. A gas dryer cost $53 more than the same model in electric. I have seen headlines saying gas prices are going up. My question is this. Does anyone have a opinion on how long it will take me to save back my extra $153 in upfront costs for the gas dryer? Obviously this depends on the relative price of gas vs. electricity in the future which no one can predict, but opinions are welcome.
Also, are there any maintenance issues with gas vs. electric dryers? This is the gas model we are thinking of getting:
http://tinyurl.com/f0wi
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BrianEWilliams wrote:

This how WE might estimate our electricity cost for clothes drying. Anyone may disagree with this if they wish. Dryer time eight (8) hours per week. (This is probably a bit overestimated) only two of us. Heater inside the dryer cuts in and out (depending on your thermostat setting) but assume it is 'on' (i.e. using electricity for heat) for three quarters of the time. That is is it is 'on' for six hours. The electric heater in our dryer, AFIK, is 3.5 kilowatts. So; 6 x 3.5 = 21 kilowatt hours of electrical consumption; per week. Our electricity costs us, on average, 8.5 cents per kilowatt hour. So; 21 x .085 = $1.76 per week. 52 weeks in a year; $1.76 x 52 = $93 per year to dry our clothes. However it varies; I have blankets/sheets etc. on the line today which in mid winter would be dried electrically. Towels also. OK. Now work out what the cost of gas would be? The difference in the cost per year, if any, divided into $153 will give you the pay back interval, in years. Another way might be to find out how much your gas would cost for the same thing as one kilowatt hour of electricity and compare that. But you'd still have to decide how long you would be running your dryer at tha difference in cost. PS. We've never had but people seem to speak highly/positively about gas water heating and gas clothes dryers and a feeling generally that 'gas is cheaper'? PPS. Is gas dryer maintenance higher; what with vents and exhaust gases etc. I presume also you MUST have a carbon monoxide detector in any home with any gas appliances? They cost I believe $20 to $40 dollars and may or may not be linked to other alarms systems. I wouldn't be without one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
gas is used to make alot of elec in places, here gas is maybe half the price of elec, depends on your kwh cost , payback? depends on use and kwh cost,would be only 4 months for me
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hmmm, very interesting. My post somehow was appended to a very relevant thread, at least on Google Groups:
http://tinyurl.com/f1sv
Not sure how this happened, but thanks to the Internet powers that be. I think I will drive my builder crazy and switch back to the gas option.
sorry_no snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (BrianEWilliams) wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BrianEWilliams wrote:

New construction? Bring _BOTH_ gas and electricity for the dryer into the laundry room. Same near the stove. It's cheap and easy now, it's expensive and difficult later.
    - bryan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

nope wrote

I agree. Then you can go with the flow down the line should utility prices change dramatically.
Dan O. - Appliance411.com http://ng.Appliance411.com/?ref411=gas+dryers
=~~~~~~
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 23 Jun 2003 20:45:39 -0400, someone wrote:
OP is trying to put too fine a point on this.
In general, it is relatively expensive to make heat with electricity. Most electricity is generated by burning a fuel (be it coal, oil, or yes gas) to begin with. (Exception: hydroelectric) Then there is inherent inefficiency in converting that heat into electricity to begin with, and transmitting it to the user. (The conversion of the elctricity back into heat is highly efficient, pretty nearly 100%.)
Thus, there is generally an inherent cost advantage to gas as a heat source, if the infrastructure is in place to deliver it to the home.
If gas prices go up, electric rates will generally follow.
OP can spend more of his time than the cost difference is worth, trying to analyze it to death, when both electric and gas rates are moving targets. Today's analysis can be inaccurate next year. But the general r'ship is generally true (except if you are in an area with cheap subsidized hydro).
-v.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
v wrote:

This is an important point. A lot of electricity is generated by burning natural gas.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bill Seurer" <Bill_AT_seurer.net> wrote in message

"shortages" and higher cost of natural gas is that many peak use gas turbine generators have been put on line recently which readily use up what was once an oversupply of gas.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill Seurer <Bill_AT_seurer.net> wrote in message

Not a lot, most of our electricity is generated by burning coal. Only a very small percentage is done by gas. Gas is too expensive to burn in large quantities. And many municipalities want to reserve their gas.
Coal is cheap and abundant in North America. Natural gas is not. Also much of New England doesn't use natural gas but instead puts giant oil tanks in the basements of the houses. These tanks have a fill up flap at the front porch of the house usually for easy access to the refueling trucks.
I don't like using volatile natural gas it's too unstable. You can't sell that to me. And you can't sell it to anyone else who is as sensible.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Eastward Bound) writes:

Wow, every time you post you make yourself look even more ignorant.
If you visit www.energy.gov and spend a little time digging around, you'll discover that in 2001, the last year for which statistics are reported, 23.4% of energy produced in the US was from coal, 19.8% was from dry natural gas, and 58.2% was from liquid natural gas.
So both your claim that most of our electricity comes from coal and your claim that "a very small percentage" comes from gas are both just flat-out wrong.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
john I agree with your thought but your numbers add to 101.4%, and we all forgot about hydro and nuclear, or maybe I missed something, different areas have different sources, and different percentages of products. and LNG I have questions about....better beans make better gas
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mark Ransley wrote:

Why? for What? Now who in the hell are you talking at, you stupid fuck? Will you ever use any usenet accepted protocol, or will you always be just a webtv shit stain?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I,m not taking any side on how much of what source produces how much electricity, just wanted to point out that
23.4% + 19.8% + 58.2% = 101.4%, and where is the % produced by oil and nuclear?
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net (Lawrence Wasserman) writes:

Woops. I thought the table I was quoting from was in percent, but in fact it's in quadrillion BTU. Not only that but one of the numbers I gave was wrong, because I read from the wrong column; doh!
The correct numbers for fossil fules are 23.4 quadrillion BTU for coal, 19.8 for dry natural gas, 12.4 for oil, and 2.5 for liquid natural gas, for a total of 58.2 quadrillion BTU. That means that coal accounts for 40% of total fossil fuel energy production and natual gas accounts for 38%.
Incidentally, the total of fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy production is 71.7 quadrillion BTU, which means that fossil fuels account for 81% of all energy produced.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Jun 2003 15:39:55 GMT, in misc.consumers.house snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net (Lawrence Wasserman) wrote:

Not to mention hydroelectric.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jonathan Kamens wrote in message ...

Gee, that adds up to 101.4%, and that's before you add in the contributions made by hydroelectric (about 6%) or nuclear (around 20%). The US Department of Energy says coal generates "slightly over half of our electricity". Talk about ignorant.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net (v) wrote in message

To all the responents, thanks for the good ideas. I talked to our Sears saleswoman, and she made a similar point that if gas prices go up, then electricity will go up too. I know this isn't strictly true, but that reasoning has led me to the gas dryer option.
Your point about endlessly analyzing things is the story of my life. I guess I like the process, so it is recreation vs. work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 14:35:20 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net (v) wrote:

Exactly 100%, but that only takes into account the power that actually makes it to the heating element.
--
BRENT - The Usenet typo king. :)

Fast Times At Ridgemont High Info http://www.FastTimesAtRidgemontHigh.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sorry_no snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (BrianEWilliams) wrote in message

Depends on how much use you are going to make of the dryer and what utility rates are like in your area.
If you are in California, which has outrageous electric rates but reasonably-priced natural gas, and you use your dryer a lot, the payback may be a small number of months. If you have relatively cheap electricity (for example, you are on public power in Washington), and don't run your dryer that often, the balance may favor the electric.
Gas dryers are more finicky about how you plumb the exhaust and keep it clean.
--
Chris Green

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.