Gas Shutoff Valve Location - In Wall Cavity?

Part of my kitchen remodel is moving the stove about 5 feet. There will be a cabinet between the new location and the existing shutoff valve, which sticks up through the floor a couple inches from the wall. This prevents me from pushing the stove all of the way back.
Since I need to move the line anyway, is it permissable to have the shutoff valve recessed within the wall? I understand newer ranges have a cutout on the back to go around the valve, but since I will have the wall open anyway, why not frame a box around the valve and not drywall the front? I think I've seen plastic boxes that fit into a stud cavity to do this, but on the floor behind the stove I really don't care how it looks.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

No reason not to finish a wall cavity and bring it up through the sill plate -- as you note, just leave adequate opening for access. You do need to insert the fire blocking into the wall opening and it really should either be finished or a box utilized, however, not just a rough-cut opening.
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Where I live the shutoff must be easily and quickly reached from next to the stove. We routed our pipe so the shutoff handle is reachable by opening the adjacent cabinet door, and we cut a 4x4 inch hole in the cabinet back, just a few inches above the floor of the cabinet. The valve itself is located within the wall, in front of the fiberglass insulation, but the handle protrudes so it is just flush with the back of the cabinet. We also put the 110v receptacle for the gas stove right next to the valve access hole, so we can either unplug it or shut off the gas easily, in an emergency. We didnt box it in, since this area only shows when you peer to the back of the cabinet.
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