Gas pipe tightening question from a newbie

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At risk of sounding like a total novice (which I am)....I would very much appreciate guidance regarding tightening gas pipe and connections:
Specifically........if a run of gas pipe is put together, in this case roughly 65 feet total, with about 15 fittings along the way, and the finished piping shows leaks in one or more joints once the line is pressurized, how is tightening best accomplished?
Since rotating a pipe with a wrench to tighten it in a fitting at one end simultaneously causes the other end of the pipe to now rotate out of the joint at the other end, perhaps starting a leak there, it seems like there is no obvious way to tighten a leaking joint without risking another leak.
The alternative, taking the whole thing apart down to the leaking joint and then rebuilding the entire remaining run also does not seem a like a smart or efficient method.
It is tempting to "overtighten" each joint initially, on the theory that backing off on one connection at a leaking end will still keep the opposite end of the pipe firmly connected after rotating the pipe. This may be the correct method, but I have not seen or heard this approach suggested.
Most of the couplings, elbows, and unions I have seen appear to accept at least a couple full (360 degree rotations) before they snug up.
I thought about putting unions all over the place so that each segment could be independently tightened. I have not seen professionals use this approach, so I am guessing this is not a great solution.....
Thanks in advance for any ideas. I am totally clueless..
Smarty (should be called not so Smarty!)
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Frankly, I use a few unions. I think the pros don't do this for 2 reasons, experience has taught them how tight everything has to be, and cost, unions cost $ couplers cost cents. A third reason is that they use liberal amounts of dope, a forth would be tools, most people don't own a 4' pipe wrench let alone 2 nice light aluminum ones.
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Lots of pipe dope / tape and more unions seems like a good way for me to proceed.

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replying to Eric in North TX, fyou2 wrote: The pros dont use unions because it is against code to use unions on gas pipe. 2 you should always undersize the wrench because u can over tighten the pipe and stretch out the fitting. Unless you are working with 3 inch pipe or bigger there is never a need for a 4 inch pipe. If there is a leak you can use a left/right nipple and coupling to use as a breaking point. Also you cant use tape on a gas thread except for the yellow tape because all other stuff is flamable. Also it is only going to be about a pound of pressure in the line so dope or rectorseal or permabond is more than enough
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On Tuesday, November 29, 2016 at 10:44:04 AM UTC-5, fyou2 wrote:

Better tell that to my gas company. There are unions at the meter.

Who could argue with that logic? Plus, you see many folks there on Home Moaners Hub working with 3"+ gas pipe?
If there is a leak you can use a

I thought the only difference was that yellow tape was thicker than white. And I don't see how flammability is an issue anyway.
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trader_4 posted for all of us...

+1
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Tekkie

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Yes, so the meter can be replaced or at the dryer after the valve. You won't find them on the main runs though, just couplings or larger pipe may be welded.
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On Tuesday, November 29, 2016 at 9:44:04 AM UTC-6, fyou2 wrote:

into TEN YEAR OLD THREADS and answer just like the original poster is still hanging around waiting on them to show up with a solution?
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On 11/29/2016 10:16 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Not to mention their "advice" is generally as this one just nonsense, anyway...
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On Tuesday, November 29, 2016 at 12:41:13 PM UTC-6, dpb wrote:

even screw in a light bulb correctly.
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Uncle Monster posted for all of us...

They don't care about you but the gerbils are their members. All they have to do is teach them how to type.
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On 11/29/2016 10:16 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
[snip]

And the ones here who REPEATEDLY complain about that (although a limited amount of that gerbil stuff is interesting).
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Smarty wrote:

Since you are a newbie don't be surprised if you have to take it apart and start over. At least your pipe is all threaded and correctly sized.
Tightening the pipe is not the solution to avoiding or correcting leaks. You should be using pipe tape which is wrapped aroung the thread on the male end . It is this tape which prevents the pipe from leaking not tightening it more or less.
So if you use the tape correctly you will have far fewer worries since the tape that does the job not the threads on the pipe. You cant be too safe when installing a gas line so be sure to double check each joint before leaving the gas on.
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Thanks Lawrence,
Now I wonder if tape is a better choice than the goopy joint pipe dope I was thinking of using?????
Smarty

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I watched the gas companys contractors install gas pipe for a furnace and watet heater. They used pipe dope and overtightened everything. They really reefed on the wrench as they tightened each joint.
You could pressure test each section as you go. Pressurize with air, and check for leaks with soap water.
Bob

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May be time for me to invest in an air compressor. Wonder if bubble / leak testing can be reliably accomplished with a cheap pump of some type?

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If you can find a Schrader valve to pipe fitting, a bicycle or car tire pump would do fine.
Bob

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Thanks very much Bob. I probably should have asked this question first:
How much tightening is normally applied for doing gas pipe? My wrenches are, at most, 12 or 14 inches long. And the pipe is mostly 1", with a few feet of 3/4 inch at the appliance (generator). Do I torque things down to the point where the male threads bottom in the fittings? I understand that dope / tape does the sealing job, but I have not a clue as to what the correct way is to tighten gas pipe joints. Your reply sounds like I maybe should be using a longer wrench and a lot of muscle.
Smarty

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More text inserted.
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Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

CY-
I don't think this is correct...the joint should be leak free way before the male thread bottoms in the fitting
I do agree with your other suggestions...12 to 14" wrenches are a little smal for 3/4 & 1" joints
cheers Bob
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