*****Gas Pipe******

I have to run a gas pipe for a new gas fireplace. In the house the pipe is 1 inch from the meter for about 20 feet and then about ten feet to the heater, water, heater and another 15 feet to a dryer. The gas fireplace is about 25 feet from the heater. Is it ok to run inch pipe to that unit or is there some point where I need to go down to inch. Is cost the only reason why they down sized to from 1 inch. I could see that there might be a problem using the inch not being able to supply the volume of gas but shouldn't be a problem, correct?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sort of, maybe. Depends on the usage of the appliance and what else is on that line. While I'd guess you are OK, it is only a guess. You have to know the input requirements of everything on the line and what the capacity of the meter/line is.
Then we can get into length of run, number of elbows, etc. What would I do? I'd run the 3/4" line and then crank up all the appliances and see if I had adequate supply. There is no "need" to go down to 1/2" at any point.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I did my gas line, I ran 1 inch to the first usage, and then dropped to 3/4. All of my drops which were less than 3 feet were done in Half inch. I dropped 3/4 to the dryer ( farthest from meter ) and bought an 3/4 to 1/2 street elbow and connected the dryer that way. My heater was the largest load at 100k btu. Fortunately for me it was the first load served. I would used black iron instead of galvanized pipe. Less problems clogging the pilot lites. I would definitely run 3/4 to the fireplace. The drop to half inch when you get to it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Glad you mentioned that. Galvanized is against the code in some areas.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In some places, you can use 3/8" bendable copper (I have it in my home) or flexible steel that looks like THIS
/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\ for a gas F/P \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks guy a couple of other questions. I have four things connected to gas but the run only one has a clean out. Not at the end of the run not at the beginning, right in the middle but it is the lowest point. Is this enough? Should I put another at the end of my run? How often should you clean this out? Funny too, the clean out is up and over a beam which would make me think stuff can get trapped in the main line. What stuff are we talking about water I guess correct?
Also is there a problem running gas pipe from a warm area like a basement to a cold garage for a heater? Would this cause extra condensation? Should I put a cleanout there just in case there is condensation?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@virtua.org (TheCouchCruncher) wrote:

I was taught that every time you go vertical instead of using an El you should use a Tee with at least a two inch capped stub.
My house has gas to every room (including bedrooms for lighting) dating from the early 1900's and the pipes all seem to follow this rule. In addition at the lowest point in the cellar there's a three foot stub terminating in the sort of gas valve they used in schools for the Bunsen burners (you push the rubber tubing over the nipple). Maybe this was some sort of pressure release/drain point. When I open it no water comes out though. Just gas.

AFAIK you don't. If you needed to drain it one would think that the stubs would all be terminated in a valve so that you don't have to get out the old pipe wrenches.

Yes. But it could be one of those things that has just been held over from the era of coal gas.

It can't hurt.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is Turtle.
Here is a pipe chart for sizing the pipe size verses the BTU needed for a appliance and you can calculate all your needs as to what size pipe to get and use.
http://www.aprsupply.com/support/aprtech14.htm
TURTLE
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.