Gas line connection help

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You really don't know how it is done, do you! To properly pressure test a gas line you need to pressurize it with air, not gas. You will need to disconnect any appliances on the line and cap it. The amount of pressure and length of test will depend on the code requirement in your area. Usually 15 or 60 PSI. There can be no drop in pressure in a specified time. The last one I tested had several hunred feet of two inch black pipe, that fed ten differant heating units. The test in our area is only for a few minutes, but it was aired up and left for well over 24 hours and it did not leak at all. Same pressure reading on the guage for the whole period. Greg
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Greg O wrote:

You are right, I only know what was explained to me and how it was done at my home. But I happen to still have the pipe, which I just checked and it has a 30 psi gauge and an air nipple. As I remember now it was pressurized with air and the reading was at mid-point (15 psi). I wouldn't call 15 psi a pressure test, and since any pipe should easily withstand 60 psi, I probably wouldn't call that a pressure test either. Since you are testing for leaks not pressure capability, so it should be a leak test.
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I will let the 25 guys I work with, the two guys in the inspections department and about 150 other plumbers and gas men I work with from time to time that we are all wrong! Thanks for pointing it out. Greg
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Greg O wrote:

You're welcome. Don't feel alone. Most professions or specialist fields have adopted some terms that make no sense, are at odds with all other accepted definitions, or are just plain crazy.
Hydraulic engineers that work with large water works talk about siphons when they refer to concrete structures or pipes that carry water through a U shape such as crossing under a river or stream or simply across a valley to a bench on the other side. The fact is that they are not siphons, which by definition operate under negative pressure. True siphons in the engineering field are extremely rare, but engineers and engineering books persist in using the siphon nomenclature for structures that are pressurized.
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At the very least, it is probably illegal. Check your local building codes.

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