gas limb pruner

Page 2 of 2  
On Tue, 11 Jun 2013 06:23:54 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@workshop.com wrote:

No, I just looked that up in wikip and they have the helicopter seeds I used to see all the time when I was little.
(Some tree near the front of my house has a small version of those seeds, but I don't know what that tree is called.)
The tree in question was about 50 feet high. Its "fruit" looks like long strings of green grapes, 4 or 5 inches long, 2 at each level, except they are less than half the size of actual grapes, they are hard, pointy at the unattached end, with a tiny bit of red-colored stuff at that end.
When they split open, they let out stuff that's lighter and finer than cotton, looks a bit like cotton, but they float. It looks even more like milkweed seeds when they are floating along, except milkweed has a big seed. This has a really small one.
Any guess what this is?

No it's a stream bed with little access. It's probably all mud now, and I don't have a tractor (not even a lawn tractor.)

I figured electric ones could barely cut.

And that's the problem with gas. (I eventually got an electric lawn mower for my 1/20th of an acre, including where the house is. )

Dang.

Me too.

There are other posts about it in this thread, including some info from me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-snip-

Here's my guess--
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Poplar_seed_tufts_2009_G1.jpg
That photo is 'next week' for those 'bunches of grapes'.
Soft wood- good for lumber, and turning- but not much else.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Didn't understand this at first. Yes, the picture is after all the grapes have burst, which has pretty much happened in the last two days. Maybe cutting the branches from the trunk sped it up.
It's a cottonwood tree, which is a kind of poplar.

One page said it was hard wood but a soft kind. !!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

-snip-

Yup-- I'd say that too, though I don't remember the specifics of *why*. In woodworking terms, yellow pine is soft-wood, though it is harder than poplar which is hard-wood.
It has been explained to me in the past-- but those brain cells seem to have disappeared.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, June 13, 2013 8:37:05 AM UTC-4, elbrecht wrote:

For what it's worth I have one of those little pruning chainsaws on a stick that attaches to the "universal" trimmer gas tools. Even came with a extension stick to make it longer. I've been satisfied with it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes, in the last few years, I now understand the expresson "I've forgotten more than you'll ever know."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do you need a power tool?
I've cut up a lot of small trees with just a hand saw, especially when they're green and soft.
Now that you can reach most of it, just get a ladder and a saw and start trimming.
It takes a long time and your time may be worth something. But on the other hand you're unlikely to hurt yourself with a handsaw, and that may not be true with a chain saw.
Oh, and really pay attention to that spring back thing. A friend of mine broke his back when he sawed off a limb end, and the rest of it jumped up when it was freed of the weight. Hit his ladder and knocked him off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

hand you're unlikely to hurt yourself with a handsaw, and that may not be true with a chain saw.

his back when he sawed off a limb end, and the rest of it jumped up when it was freed of the weight. Hit his ladder and knocked him off.
Thanks. Because of your warning and others', I spent a lot of time picking which branches to cut off first, etc. and thinking about the position of the ladder,
A lot of it was 6 to 10" thick. I never would have finished with a hand saw.
P&M
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.