Gas leak emergency instructions

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wrote:

When my house blows up, I'll call you first. ;)
The only numbers in my cell phone are my home number and my husband's cell phone. He's the only person with my cell number.
I'll call my insurance agent from my office. There's a phone book there.
Of course, it might take me a while to find my car keys. My car might be ok, depending on the size of the explosion. The house is concrete block with a very flimsy wooden roof, and the detached garage is also concrete block.
Or, possibly, I could just keep from having a gas leak. So far, so good. Millions of houses with natural gas have never blown up in--what--100 years?
Cindy Hamilton
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Cindy Hamilton wrote:

Phone book? How quaint!

Natural gas explosions blow the bottom of the structure outward then the room comes straight down.
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That scenario used to be taught as the way manufactured gasses like propane behaved but experience has shown that is too simplistic a view. Too much depends on the concentration, point of ignition, construction type and quality, and more to make such blanket assertions.
-- Tom Horne
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re: point of ignition
I watched a movie where the bad guy placed a lit candle on top of the fridge and then loosened the hose to the gas range just a little bit.
He was long, long gone before the gas reached the level of the candle and ignited.
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wrote:

re: point of ignition
I watched a movie where the bad guy placed a lit candle on top of the fridge and then loosened the hose to the gas range just a little bit.
He was long, long gone before the gas reached the level of the candle and ignited.
=================== Feh. Sounds like an amateur. :-) Not enough drama. This is the right way:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mdmRcgjN1m0

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It's always there. It always works. I can usually look up something in the phone book faster than anybody can search online. It's the appropriate technology for finding local numbers.

Easier to find the keys that way, then.
I figure the most likely place for a substantial gas leak in my house is the basement. I'd probably smell it if the stove had a leak--until I become a feeble old lady and then I'd probably welcome a quick death in an explosion. Or, at least, I wouldn't be around later to regret it.
If I had the boilover situation described by Thomas, I'd scamper down the stairs. The shutoff for the stove is right there. And, I'm not the sort of cook who has boilovers or other irregularities.
If the gas company had a problem that my entire block went up... Well, sometimes people just die. My entire block is one- and two-acre lots, so that would minimize the collateral damage. I doubt many people on my block have natural gas; I know the neighbors on either side of me still use propane--I can see the tanks. Barely.
Really, if you go through life worrying about every little thing, you might as well just end it now.
Cindy Hamilton
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When my house blows up, I'll call you first. ;)
The only numbers in my cell phone are my home number and my husband's cell phone. He's the only person with my cell number.
I'll call my insurance agent from my office. There's a phone book there.
Of course, it might take me a while to find my car keys. My car might be ok, depending on the size of the explosion. The house is concrete block with a very flimsy wooden roof, and the detached garage is also concrete block.
Or, possibly, I could just keep from having a gas leak. So far, so good. Millions of houses with natural gas have never blown up in--what--100 years?
Cindy Hamilton
You're assuming gas leaks are entirely under your control.
re:"Millions of houses with natural gas have never blown up in--what--100 years?", It's happened a little more recently than that. http://articles.latimes.com/1992-01-18/news/mn-273_1_natural-gas And I had to wade through a bunch of google results to find the one I was looking for. Getting home from work that day sucked.
j
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On the serious side...
2 years ago I came home from work to find my stepdaughter on the front porch in a panic. She tried to cook something on the gas stove. It boiled over and put out the flame. The house was about 10 minutes into the gas. To turn off the stove from the high setting it must pass through the electronic ignition. I ran and opened the kitchen door and windows and fanned the gas away the best I could, siad a quick hail Mary and turned it off. I was lucky that day.
I have never seen such an idiotic ignition setup in my life. If I had been a few minutes late it would have been a disaster.
Thomas.
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wrote:
-snip-

Mine's a 4yr old Kenmore. Didn't realize it until I turned a burner on and didn't notice that it hadn't lit for a minute or so. Got some singed eyebrows when I instinctively just turned it off.
If there was even a .1 [.01?] second delay before the igniter started you could get past that when the burner is throwing gas in the room.
Seems like pilots & thermocouples were much safer- but I haven't seen any data that talks about more than singed hairs and rapid heartbeats as consequences.
Jim
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.
Fortunately, not all stoves are designed that way. On mine, you have to push the knob in to activate the spark and it has to have a flame to stay on. Just turning on the know won't turn on the gas, you have to hold it for a couple of seconds one lit for the thermocouple to sense heat.
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Our Father who art in Heaven I might be there, too, in a second!
Thy kingdom come.... but not yet this one....
On Earth, instead of in Heaven.
Glad you didn't have an explosion. That woulda been nasty.
--
Christopher A. Young
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wrote:

There a lot of people that just like to argue.
Those who only have cell phones tend to rethink that decision the first time they have power out for an extended time. :-)
Andy
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Not really. I don't think the gas company wants to encourage people getting on the front porch and then standing there calling the gas company on their cell.
--
An old friend once said "You don\'t live on the edge,
you\'re taking up way too much space."
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On Oct 1, 10:18am, "Stormin Mormon"

What if none of my neighbors are home?
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