Gas furnace replacement

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I have an old Singer furnace, model GL1406, which I'm told is over 30 years old (I've owned the house for 23 years). Except for two recent minor electrical problems which cut off power to the blower motor, the unit has been working fine. I have been told, however, that the blower bearings are not in great shape and I should get a new furnace and it would be a lot more efficient. Our gas bills, in NYC, have been very high lately, but is it worth $4500 for a new Carrier 80% efficient furnace + $800 for a "by-pass humidifier" to gain that efficiency? Prices include installation and readapting ductwork, plumbing and electric. Which other brands should I consider?
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Get bids 4500 may or may not be high, but getting an 80 % in your location is foolish with future gas prices trends. Look at 94.5% efficient units, you dont mention your gas heat cost.
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800 for a humidifier is to high, it does not add efficiency only comfort.
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gto with at least a 90 + furnace, 800 for a humidifer is too much too
get more quotes
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m Ransley wrote:

Hi, Not really. With proper humidity you can lower the temp. which means saving. Less gas consumption = more efficency?
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Yes.
No.
Efficiency for a furnace is defined somewhere and shouldn't be used differently by a furnace salesman. It relates to how much heat is produced for a given amount of fuel. If a humidifier increased effiiciency, then my furnace that is 27 years old would have high efficiency because I have installed a humidifier.
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mm wrote:

Hi, I know but over all as a heating system if less gas is used it's same as better efficiency, isn't it? Efficiency is ratio between energy input vs. output. Theoretical maximum is 1(100%). Where I live, government cushion, the gas price increase. No matter how high it goes, at certain price and on, government picks it up in the form of rebate directly to utility company. During heating season this policy is in force.
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On Sat, 11 Mar 2006 06:58:17 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

Use an ultrasonic humidifier. Place a skirt under it to catch the mineral deposits from the mist. You need moisture around you not in the whole house. Whole house humidity can cause condensation leading to mold and wood rot. Better still have a lot of house plants. They respire and put moisture into the air as well as supply oxygen. Water them sparingly. If the plants thrive so will you. The other advantages of house plants will be self evident when you have them.
Furnace mounted forced air drum type and hallway drum type humidifiers are more of a hassle than a help. The foam elements clog up with mineral deposits very quickly and are hard to remove. Replacement foam elements cost an arm and a leg. However my main objection is that slime molds and mico-organisms find the wet tepid water an ideal culture medium in which to propogate. If you ever have one or can take a look at one you will find the water tray full of slimy strands and films. They produce spores. The spore get blown into the air with the furnace air. You have a health problem.
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Paul Isaacs wrote:

I'b be more concerned with the contractor. I'd get some more estimates and also strongly consider getting a 90%+ furnace. With energy prices likely to climb even higher, I think the incremental cost is already justified. I don't know what kind of re-adapting is required to put in the new unit, where it's located, etc. But the tip off that something is wrong here is that this guy wants $800 for a bypass humidifier that's being installed at the same time as a new furnace? You can get a top of the line Aprilaire 700 (which I highly recommend as opposed to the bypass type) for $225 retail and installation, especially at the same time as a furnace is not very difficult. IMO, $800 is a rip off.
BTW, does that $4500 include air conditioning? I sure hope so!
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This is Turtle.
Yes it is time for a new one because of furture gas prices.
I would concider a 90% afue or better.
$4500 + $800 for the humidity control may be too much as the group says but what is too much for your area. Get you a second bid to just check to see what too much is. i don' t know the prices in your area and this $4500 might be normal for i don't know.
The price of a job is only about 1/2 of the job but the other 1/2 is the professional that will do a good job. So be more looking at what company does the job than the price of it.
TURTLE
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I can not imagine why anyone in any east coast location would want a humidifier, ever. It's already too humid here year round.
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we when you heat air the humidity level drops a lot, higher humidity appears warmer so you can run a lower temperature and save energy
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yeah, can't believe he really lives on the east coast. It's only really humid here July/August. And humidifier, as you pointed out, is useful in winter, when without one, with it cold outside, the inside humidity can get very low. Maybe he likes getting static shocks?
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wrote:

humidity
energy
only
out, is

inside
shocks?
Or maybe he lives on the East Coast of FLorida.
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First, the price sounds high. I'm in western NYS, and my boss gets about two grand for a 80% furnace, and not much more for the humidifier.
Like folks say, the humidifier doesn't add much work when done at the same time. And the 90% furnace is an excellent idea.
I live in NY state. When it's winter, and there is snow on the ground, there is a definite need for humidity in houses. And in summer, there is a definite need for dehumidifying.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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Paul Isaacs wrote:

I am with the rest. The price sounds too high, get more estimates and do look for a more efficient furnace 80% is low by today's standards. I would not go below 90%
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Hmmm, No rebate from government when you do this kind of furnace upgrade?????????
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Well, thanks everyone for replies. Yes I though $800 quite high for a humidifier. My plumber who seems very honest recommended the hvac company as being honest, but I'm not sure as hvac man keeps saying he's honest. I definitely will get other bids and look to a higher efficiency unit. As for wanting a humidifier with a forced-air system, my house sure feels dry during heating season so that's a definite plus for me. And no, the $4500 does not include AC. No one mentioned other brand furnaces, my neighbor had a Trane installed a couple of years ago for around $3500.

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Paul Isaacs wrote:

Don't worry about what brand furnace you end up with. The most important part of the deal is the tech who will help pick the right equipment and size and installation for your specific situation. A good tech will choose good equipment for you. Brand names are not always an indication of quality.
--
Joseph Meehan

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wrote:

That sounds pretty high to me.
Three weeks ago I replaced my old, natural draft furnace.
Using my friend/HVAC perfectionist's suppliers, we installed the system with my obligation being only his costs. He and I go back >40-years, he was a groomsman at my wedding >32-years ago. I have seen the actual invoices.
Total REAL cost before tax: $1786.
$640 - WeatherKing 92% condensing furnace ("92.8%" AFUE) 255 - Evaporator coil assembly 891 - Rheem 13 SEER outdoor air conditioner
Of course, that does not account for the relatively minor bill from the sheet metal supply house, the fancy, right angle pleated filter housing and sundry supplies. Nor does it account for the adult beverages and fuel for hauling my friend around. I am quite pleased with the job. It was a VERY valuable learning experience for me. I might even be able to do it MYSELF again - in my next life! HA!
--
:)
JR

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