Gas

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Spend a day at the docks and the gas storage places. You'll see all sorts of truck getting the same gas for different brand stations.
It may be possible that the truck responded to a different gas, but there may be other reasons. Why was it sluggish? Is there some mechanical reason that it was not running properly? Unless something was different than normal (he may have changed computers for all I know) there is no difference in 99% of the cars designed for 87 octane.
I drive about 30,000 miles a year, sometimes as much as 50,000. I've tried different brands, different octanes, and if the car is running properly I've not see any difference. This is in a half dozen cars I've driven over the past 15 or 20 years.
I go for cheap and have no problems. My older car has 139,000 miles (the plugs were changed at 75,000) and it starts, runs, and gets the same gas mileage as the day it was new. My new car has 90,000 miles, original plugs, same deal.
Try the 76 and report back. Chances are thee will be no difference except a few $ out of your wallet.
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waste of money using premium gas when your motor will run on regular..The really old cars run like shit on the 10% ethanol/gasoline fuel
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On 1 Jan 2005 08:16:06 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

My 1983 Honda Civic manual says "use regular gas," but when I do, my car runs rough, stalls, and gets low fuel-miles. Auto mechanics say that if your car runs better with premium, use it. I've even heard recommendations of occasionally using premium, perhaps every 4th fill up, which helps clear out injectors, plugs, and exhaust.
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Is your friend buying his gas accross the border in Nevada? This is a common practice for some folks who live near the border and live in Cali..................It's cheaper and it's better gas too, with less additive crap in it. I read recently that California is fairly PO'd about Truckers doing that before they drive into Theor state to avoid the cost, so They are going to ( may have already done so) make it where there is a cost per mile to operate vehicles in California..........although I don't think they have yet.
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Don't know about CA or other western states, but here in the east, truckers must have fuel use permits for each state. They report the miles driven and pay the fuel tax accordingly. You get a credit for fuel purchased in that state.
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Dan_Musicant wrote:

to me, there are 3 tiers of gas...
the full price, like chevron, 76, etc. the discounters, like costco, sams, vons the unknown mom n pop places.
the discounters have a reputation to uphold, so their stations are generally clean, and they still have a good price. i just dont trust the unknowns. yes, they all get gas from the same sources. but who knows when the mom n pop places replace their gas pump fuel filters, etc.
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wrote:

I found that premium BP, Amoco or Shell makes my car run smooth and efficiently. If I buy Racetrack or Direct premium gas, my car tends to run rough and stalls. My car is a 1983 model and it is very sensitive. Some gas stations will have higher water content which will cause rough idling, especially during the winter months. I've heard truckers say that 76 gas is all they buy.
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Real truckers buy diesel :)
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:wrote: : :>OK, this is off topic for alt.home.repair but I can't resist putting it :>in my crosspost, there's so many canny folks who check out that NG, and :>I know almost all of them drive.:> :>I was chatting with my auto mechanic the other day and I asked him if he :>thought all gas was pretty much the same these days - an idea I'd been :>encountering. He didn't agree at all. :> :>Now I guess I should say that I have no connections with the petroleum :>industry of any kind, none in the auto industry either, or any other :>industry associated in any way with gasoline.:> :>He said his truck was running sluggishly and he put in a tank of 76 high :>octane and could hardly believe the difference it made. Suddenly the :>truck ran smoothly. He said he has a lot of evidence that he and other :>people are getting very significantly better mileage since switching to :>76. I guess that's 76 Union, unless they've changed their name.:> :>I asked him if he had any experience with their regular gas, and he :>couldn't really say, it seemed.:> :>I thought I'd throw this out there and see what other people think.:> :>Myself, I've been using the cheapest regular I can find, usually from :>Costco, or a station I know where they sell pretty cheap if you give :>them cash. I drive less than 2000/year with my two cars, so it isn't a :>giant deal for me, but more mileage and smoother performance would be :>reason enough for me to switch to a recommended brand.:> :>Dan : : :I found that premium BP, Amoco or Shell makes my car run smooth and :efficiently. If I buy Racetrack or Direct premium gas, my car tends :to run rough and stalls. My car is a 1983 model and it is very :sensitive. Some gas stations will have higher water content which :will cause rough idling, especially during the winter months. I've :heard truckers say that 76 gas is all they buy.
One of my cars is an '83, too. It doesn't run as smoothly as it used to. Thing is, I rarely use that car. It's a Chrysler Town and Country mini-wagon, and I only use it for Home Depot runs for big sheets of plywood and stuff like that. Since I don't do that too frequently, most of the time I use it is to give it a spin just to keep it running OK. My mechanic said I should think about keeping the gas tank topped up to minimize the effect of water condensing from the air in the tank, so I try to keep it pretty near full. I guess I'll try the 76 in that car and see if it runs better. My other car's running better. It's my "every day" car, although I often go a couple of weeks or more without using it!
Dan
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ONLY BUY TOPTIER GAS!
http://www.toptiergas.com /

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Dan_Musicant wrote:

In Australia it seems we have different octane ratings to you. Ordinary unleaded gas (we call it petrol) is 91 octane. Premium is 95 or 96. There are some super premiums at 98 octane.
I have an 89 Ford Telstar (which is a rebadged Mazda 626, made by Mazda in Japan). It has about 100k miles on it.
My mechanic recommended Shell Premium (96 Octane) as he said while it costs more (approx 10%), the decreased fuel consumption will often make up the difference, plus the engine will run cooler.
I thought it was hogwash until one day when we were on a long trip in summer (when it was 95-100 degrees F air temperature), the engine was getting very hot (almost at the top of the gauge) so the next lot of fuel we put in was preimum. The engine immediately went back to normal temperature. Plus we have found the lower fuel consumption more than makes up for the extra cost, so we have stuck with premium.
91 octane fuel is below the common octane levels in many other countries, but usually high-selling imported cars sold here are modified to run ok on 91. However some cars (sporty cars e.g. Mazda RX8, or low selling models like VW Polo) are not modified so they require 95 octane.
http://www.caltex.com.au/products_oil_detail.asp?id  http://www.bp.com.au/catalogue/default.asp Shell http://tinyurl.com/5hanq
Here we also get coupons for Caltex and Shell from the two major supermarkets. Spend $30 AUD or more and gets 4c AUD / litre off the next petrol purchase - that's about 4% off.
Petrol here is about $1.00 AUD / litre - that's about $2.95 USD per US gallon. Premium is about 10% dearer.
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76, huh?
Around here, the Octane ratings are 87, 98, 91, and sometimes 93...

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On 1/2/2005 10:40 AM US(ET), HeatMan took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

--
Bill

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This is Turtle.
I have been down this road on gas for my company trucks for years and came up with two things to do and you will do fine with fuel.
1) look in the book that come with the auto and get the Octane Rated gas your suppose to be burning. Then when going to gas up Get that octane rated fuel only for your auto is designed to burn that octane fuel. The ratings will be from 86 to 93 octane ratings. Us the one the auto maker say for your computor on the auto is set to burn that octane fuel. I have my truck that are to be burninmg 87 octane fuel. I can put 93 octane fuel and it seems I get worst mileage than with 87 octane fuel. Now the newer model have a sencer to adjust the fuel flow rate to the engine to take care of 93 in a 87 octane car but it will take a 1/2 tank or so for your computor to get use to the higher octane fuel. Pick out the octane rating your auto should be using from the book in the auto and use it.
2) Alway buy your gas at stations that move a lot of fuel to not get old gas sitting in the tanks for too long and start to degrade. Gas will be very poor if left in a tank for 18 months and need rerefining of it.
Tell your Mechanic to go read his book for his auto on what octane fuel he should be burning and he will solve his problem with fuel.
Now 20+ years ago Amoco had White Gas and others has regular leaded gas. This white gas was better but when regulation and unleaded gas come along. The white gas was history. Your Mechanic has these left over thoughts of this era and I still have them but they are just thoughts now a days.
When all else fails Read the instructions.
TURTLE
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Use only top tier gas: http://www.toptiergas.com/retailers.html

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I see in another post that you're from CA. So am I. This makes a difference.
The 76 station near my house has a HUGE sign that advertises "NO MTBE." Don't know if all 76 stations are MTBE-free, but most of the others haven't gotten rid of it yet. That probably accounts for the difference in mileage. I don't know about the running smoother thing, though.
I heard that newer cars/trucks need the octane they're designed for even though they run fine (no knocks) w/ lower octane gases. The computers adjust to make them run ok, but the performance and efficiency go down. So I think it just depends on the car.
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