Garden hose or occasional use -- buy quality?

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I may be needing another 200 or so feet of garden hose for a work project. Might need the hose two or three times a year, for use during the day.
Should I buy the cheap $7.97 lengths of 50 feet from Walmart, or get the braided nylon good stuff for 14.97?
Don't want to go 100 feet, that's too clumsy to handle. Since the hose is used one or two days a year, I'm leaning toward the cheap hose, it won't get much use. And won't be out in the sunshine for very long. The expensive stuff means more credit card debt.
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On Thu, 21 Apr 2011 09:25:30 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

If you need it to last forever, really run up the credit card debt and buy Sears Craftsman Rubber Hose. They will replace it forever, just like the tools
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On Apr 21, 9:25 am, "Stormin Mormon"

I mean this in the nicest way, really:
If $60 needs to be placed on a CC and carried as long term debt, perhaps your cash flow is such that you should forgo this project...unless, of course, the project is going to make you money in the long run.
If you can't afford the hose with your existing cash, how will you pay for the water it uses or any other expenses related to the project?
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On Thu, 21 Apr 2011 07:13:43 -0700, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Where'd the "long term" come from? It's still a debt no matter how long it takes to pay it back. Personally I hate putting stuff on credit cards even if I know it'll be paid off in a month.
cheers
Jules
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On Apr 21, 11:52 am, Jules Richardson

re: "Where'd the "long term" come from? "
Call it an assumption, but when someone takes the time to mention "The expensive stuff means more credit card debt." (note the use of the word "more") *and* brings it up as part of the decision making process, it seems to me that it's not going to get paid off anytime soon.
Obviously, for SM's sake, I'd love to be wrong and have made a bad assumption, but I'd really curious as to why the words "more credit card debt" were mentioned if it wasn't an pretty big issue.
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We run $3-$7k a month on credit cards, all paid for the first statement, no interest. Those plane tickets sure pile up in a hurry.
Steve
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I take cash - or Home Depot gift cards if there is a discount. I get from 1-5% back. Then sometimes a 10% off gift card.
If I was a better book keeper I could tell you what the CC folks are paying *me*--- but I can guarantee they haven't gotten a dime of my money in decades.
Jim
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wrote:

I mean this in the nicest way, really:
If $60 needs to be placed on a CC and carried as long term debt, perhaps your cash flow is such that you should forgo this project...unless, of course, the project is going to make you money in the long run.
If you can't afford the hose with your existing cash, how will you pay for the water it uses or any other expenses related to the project?
reply:
Lemmeeseeeeeeeeeeeeeeee. Buy one and put it on a credit card, and end up paying what I could have paid for one with a lifetime guarantee....................
Wait, wait, I know this one .........................................
I'm with you, DD.....
I never really knew what a good hose was until the construction company doing street repairs ran over my cheapo garden hose. They replaced it with a Goodyear hose with the heavy brass fittings. After that, I learned the differences in hoses, and have never bought another cheap hose. Of course, I haven't had to because these don't die unless I leave them out full of water in freezing weather. I have found some at yard sales at the ridiculous prices of $3-$5, and I gobble them up. I then go to the tire store and get free rims, and mount them on a piece of scrap pipe, making a neato hose holder, particularly any you can find with a hubcap.
AND, there's no CC debt dilemma or guilt...........
Steve
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One can get free rims at a tire store? Seriously? I'm looking for some way to store one of my backyard hoses & don't want to spring for a second cart. Please advise. Tx
HB
and mount them on a piece of scrap pipe, making a

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Same thing struck me. He is talking about buying 4, 50' sections. Difference between the cheap and the 'good' is only abotu $24 using his figures.
Harry K
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We don't buy anything on credit. If we do not have the money saved we don't need it. Always had low paying jobs. now retired and have less. However we live fine with what we have and not what we wish for. Sent 2 boys to college and have no debts. That credit thing is why so many people are in financial trouble. ww
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People who need to claim business expenses for tax purposes usually select a credit card which is ONLY used for such expenses... Makes accounting all that much easier... Only 12 monthly statements to keep track of to have an organized explanation of the charges...
Keeping a cash ledger and all those cash receipts for a business takes a lot of time which a lot of people would rather not have to do administratively...
~~ Evan
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OK Buster, you asked fer it. Jes wait fer that knock on the door. The FBI bin tipped off to yer UNAMERICAN activity!
HB
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On Thu, 21 Apr 2011 09:25:30 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

How do the prices stack up for 50' v 100' v 200' etc.? At least if one 50' section breaks you're not replacing the entire run - but then maybe 50' lengths are far more expensive per foot than longer hoses?
cheers
Jules
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Hoses tend to break where people crease them to cut off water flow (instead of using the faucet), when they're run over by something (lawn mower) or when they're full of water with a closed nozzle/ sprayer on the end and then left out in the hot sun (water expands). If none of those apply then it's way cheaper to get the cheap hose and if necessary keep an extra 50' as a spare (unless of course running to the store if it breaks is an option, then you don't need the spare).
If hoses didn't last a dozen uses nobody would own hoses.
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wrote:

I'm still using the cheap, yellow flexible things. Haven't replaced one in years and they stay out year round, draped over anything convenient or just lay on the ground. Yes, they kink by just looking at them but it only takes a few seconds to walk the lenght and unkink after stretching them out.
Harry K
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On 4/21/2011 10:55 AM, Jules Richardson wrote:

I put every dime we spend on discover. Yes, mcdonalds and burger king also. REWARDS!. pay off each month, they make nothing off me.
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Steve Barker
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On Apr 21, 11:55 am, Jules Richardson

I'm sure you know that they make repair couplings.
If I had a 200' hose and it sprung a leak at 75' (or would that be 125'?) I wouldn't replace the entire run, I'd give up a few inches and repair it.
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We have tons of everyday commercially hard used Craftsman tools (including hoses), and do warranty exchanges on the broken ones sometimes weekly. Did all that buying nonsense back in the early 70's... the Craftsman warranty has been a great value for us.
However, I'm becoming concerned that Sears might not be around much longer. There is never anyone in the store anymore, and the price/quality points of their other goods is 'amazing'.
Erik
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At home I buy the even better quality. For projects where I may be leaving it overnight I buy the cheap stuff so the thieves won't bother to steal it.
The only thing I would point out is that the cheaper hoses have a tendecy to kink even when new. On a 50 or 100 foot run I accept that as the cost of doing business. :)
Colbyt
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