garden fence at right-angle to house

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We wish to straighten and 'position correctly' the garden fence that we share with a neighbour in an adjoining terraced house.
What is the best way to get the fence at exactly right angles to our houses? The garden is about twenty metres long. Thanks for advice.
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On Tue, 08 Jul 2008 07:41:15 +0100, john westmore wrote:

=================================Get a large sheet (6' x 2')of chipboard or an old door and lay it flat with one short edge along the wall of the house. Use this board as a 'square' and run a string line along side it to give you a straight line at 90 degrees to your houses.
Cic.
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Apply the old 3,4,5 rule. 3 foot along wall, 4 foot along fence and 5 foot for the hypotenuse to make the right angle.

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On Tue, 08 Jul 2008 07:52:36 GMT, "Dave"

The OP is in the UK, and the EU has forced them to use metres for measurements. Of course this changes everything. If he wants to use 3 metres and 4 metres, he's going to need a trig calculator to find the length of the hypotenuse. Just wanted to warn you, OP.

Just kidding.

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Yep. I'm in Oz. Down here we use the 4 side on the wall.

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wrote:

I think I could do that one in my head, let me think now, yes I think I have got it, the hypotenuse would be 5 metres. ;-)
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Or for a more accurate measurement, use Pythagoras's theorem. Lay a 3 unit length against the wall, a 4 unit length as the boundary guide, and a 5 unit length to make up the other side of the right angled triangle.
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On Tue, 08 Jul 2008 08:52:57 +0100, Harry Stottle wrote:

---------------------------------
=================================Doesn't that just make a large set square - something like a rectangular board with squared corners?
Cic.
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It does if the original rectangular 'old door', or sheet of 6' x 2' chipboard, has perfectly squared corners, but 1/2 an inch out and it could result in land grab ;-)
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What!
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john westmore wrote:

As others have said, the 3:4:5 triangle with a bit of string will do that.
However, it doesn't mean that it is necessarily the right place for the fence.. With any luck, if you toddle up the garden you may find the (remains) of the boundary marker. Which may be just a small wooden post in the ground.
The original builders may not have been that precise with the right angle as you seem determined to be. Your neighbour may not be too happy if your efforts leaves the boundary post well and truly your side of the fence.
-- Sue
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john westmore wrote:

As others have suggested, use the 3,4,5 rule (it's what the builders of the pyramids in Egypt did).
If the houses are 20 meters apart, you can use 15, 20, 25 meter measurements.
However there's one difficulty you may encounter. The wall may be square to one house and crooked as a dog's hind leg at the other.
I recommend bushes.
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Weird.... I thought the pyramids pre-date Pythagoras by 1 or 2 millennia?
--
Martin





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And your point is?
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Martin wrote:

Uh, they did. But right angles pre-dated the pyramids by at least several decades.
The circle is even older.
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HeyBub wrote: ...

Wow!!! By "several decades"????!!!! That long. Who'da thunk it? :)
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Right angles (and every other angle) have been around forever, it's just that nobody named them. Same as gravity, space, oxygen, grass, ocean, sky, etc. etc.

See above. There has been at least two circles from the day man was 'born', and he saw them every day, the sun and the moon
Cheers
John
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On Wed, 9 Jul 2008 00:35:33 +0100, in misc.consumers.frugal-living "John"

Not to mention the circle that "man" was born out of.
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Martin wrote:

They do. And IIRC the Egyptians knew 3,4,5 but not the general rule about the square of the hypotenuse etc. - which is what Pythagoras discovered. Oh hang on...In another source...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pythagorean_theorem
Andy
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wrote:

This is bad. You'll end up with something 3 times as big as a pyramind.

Good points.

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