Garbage Chute Soundproofing

I live in a very quiet condo building. Unfortunately my bedroom is close to the garbage chute, and it sounds like it is emptying out into my bedrrom. Can anyone suggest some ideas for deadening the noise. I want to go to my association and offer to pay for some sort of fix for this. As far as I can tell it is a metal square chute and drywall between it and a corner of my bedroom/bathroom.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think that to improve much on the situation, you'll need to build a partition wall offset from the existing drywall enclosure by maybe 3" or so. This new wall should have no attachment or any other connection to the existing enclosure surfaces. The offset gap should be filled with fiberglass insulation. The trick of the project is to find/create structure on the walls and ceiling, offset from the existing enclosure, for connection of the new walls. If all else fails, there's always adhesive attachment.
bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think it will be tricky to build any internal (to the condo) solutions. The chute and room span the bedroom and the bathroom and a dividing wall between the two. There has to be something I can put between my wall and the chute to deaden the noise at least a little. What about pumping foam or something in? Would that help?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
foam that would harden actually would not reduce noise significantly. Also, a "pumped-in" type of installation is likely to collapse the chute. It's very tricky to control the amount of expansion of foam products.
If you can make access holes through the drywall, it might be possible to fill the gap with a rockwool type of insulation. provided that there is a firebreak installed at the floorline that will retain the insulation.
Anything you would do external to that existing drywall, though, should probably be cleared through the condo assoc or whatever. You could get into some deep dudu ($$$) if something went wrong. bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The chase ( the drywall assembly enclosing the chute ) should be fire rated. That means cutting into it and reclosiing it should be done by a pro.
My first thought is to wrap the duct with sound deadening batts. That would reduce the viberation of the sheet metal and so reduce the noise. What ever material is used must be fire resistant / noncombustable. TB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Three solutions come to mind:
1. Earplugs: fifty-cents. 2. Glue the openings above you shut. 3. A new condo rule: No using the chute between 10:00pm and 6:00am.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JerryMouse wrote:

False wall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That is going to be a tough one.
http://www.soundproofing.org /
You want weight. Heavy things (drywall lead sheets etc.) block sound well.
You also want to prevent any direct solid connections. Stagger wall studs or use special isolation devices to keep the sound from traveling through the wall (remember the two cans on a string (well wire actuarially worked) you want to break the wire).
Filling in wall cavities with sound absorbing materials (accustical fiberglass bats) will do a little.
Point source control (special absorption material) at the source of the sound will also help.
--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.