Garage Upgrade - Climate Control

I am inheriting a very good condition 1960's Buick convertible. I have a two car detached garage already waiting to be the car's new home, but the garage is not heated or climate controlled. It is a 1940's frame garage with asphalt shingle roof with stud walls and a poured cement floor. It is already wired for electricity with lights and outlets. Overall the garage is in very good condition, but I do notice that is is somewhat damp inside and this concerns me for maintaining the car in a good condition in a relatively dry storage environment.
My question is what will need to be done to such a building so that I can keep the car in it in a relatively controlled environment? I assume the walls need to be lined with a tyvex type sealer, and insulation added in the walls and in the eaves? In addition, currently there is no ventilation at the roofline which I think will need to be addressed.
Finally, any suggestions for heating source? I assume the temp just needs to stay at 50 or above in the winter.
Thank you in advance for any suggestions.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You dont need a warm temp just a lower humidity in spring and summer but even that might not be an issue it hasnt been for old cars I have had.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ransley wrote:

Thanks for the response!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If the dampness is on the slab surface, it may be the result of warm, moist air condensing on a cold slab. I do not think the walls need to be 'sealed'. Insulation at the roof would help most. How that is accomplished depends on your climate.
T
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net wrote:

Thanks for the info! The dampness on the slab floor is from condensation.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I has a 54 Buick stored , the only thing I noticed in an unheated humid garage was exhaust system rust, I think the concrete was always damp, maybe putting a sheet of thick plastic under the car would have helped a dehumidifier would be good but get one that doesnt freeze at 68f, it isnt the temp that kills metal its moisture in the air.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

climate area helps determine which building cross section ideas and views, plenty at: http://www.buildingscienceconsulting.com/resources /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cars last longer in unheated garages, or at least cars that are daily drivers do. So there's one thing you probably don't need to worry about. Just buy some plug-in dehumidifier (if you can find one big enough for the room) and have a hose drain the water to someplace outside. Considering that it's a convertible, humidity is probably your #1 concern.
Or, sell the car! ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob M. wrote: ...

Why would that be so? In that case, it seems museums shouldn't worry so much about climate control...
I agree excessive moisture could be problematical and I also would presume there are sites for auto enthusiasts which have specific recommendations for storage conditions.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

Hmmm, Cars in the museum is not driven daily in all weather conditions.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony Hwang wrote:

Nor is OP's collector convertible, it is to be presumed...
That notwithstanding, I fail to see why even a routinely driven automobile would fare better in a non-climate-controlled storage space than not...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

Mainly true in snow-salt country. Car has snow and salt on it, and storing in a heated garage allows the snow and salt more chances to melt and run into crevices, allowing more chance for rot to develop. Rust slows down in cold weather. All in all, it is better to keep the car as cold as you can all winter, then wash the heck out of it on the day the weather changes, to minimize the exposure of the various parts to a constant salt bath. Rule of thumb- if it is wet, rust is taking place. Same reason car covers are advertised as 'breathable', so condensation won't build up with humidity and temp swings.
If you wanna pass it down to your kids, you store it in a dry sealed container. You only drive it on warm sunny days. Rust is inevitable- at best you can slow it down for a few years.
-- aem sends....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aemeijers wrote:

This car will not be a daily driver. This is a convertible that will used occasionally on sunny weekend days in the spring, summer and fall. I do not plan on driving it it on rainy days, or in the winter when there is salt on the road.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aemeijers wrote:

Hi, Yes. I live in COLD Northern climate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

After you tidy up the garage isulation, etc., install a Modine "HotDawg" heater. Set at 55 degrees or so, it will keep the concrete warm enough to avoid the condensation common to unheated spaces. I have the 45K BTU model in my 26 x 26 garage (Illinois) and it does the job nicely. Similar installation can e found in "climate controlled" self storage units. HTH
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.