garage door torsion springs

so these springs apparently break about every 5 to 7 years and one of my 2 springs went sproing over the weekend.
from scouring sears, home depot and lowes, they sell everything I need, except the torsion springs (they sell the vertical type, not the horizontal type that runs on the bar across the garage)
from reading a few online sites, it appears many people have written excellent descriptions and have successfully replaced their own springs without dying or getting maimed or blinded - a few even have excellent step-by-step videos, though some of these clearly sell parts online.
what say you ? at issue is why should I pay someone close to 300 for a job where the parts cost 30 to 65 ?
easing the tension on the spring is no laughing matter but it's no more dangerous than lifting your car on a jack and replacing a tire.
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You can do it yourself, Jake. You already understand that it's not a cake walk but at the same time, there are plenty of things that are just as dangerous if not more so. Afterall, the spring isn't going to jump off the axle and cut a carotid artery.
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C & E wrote:

Having replaced one, I can tell you that they certainly are no fun to do solo. With a helper teaming it would be a lot more manageable. As for getting the springs, you have to go to a "real" door place like Overhead Door to buy them.
At least one manufacturer has a new design that uses a worm gear arrangement to replace the old bar-in-hole tensioning setup, which makes it a heck of a lot easier and safer.
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I own a self storage facility with lots and lots of roll up doors with torsion springs. Although they see limited use, springs do break, usually from a bit of rust causing a weak spot. The springs are $20 apiece (takes 2) and one technician drives 30 miles to our facility to replace them, standard commercial service call for $80. The brand is Trac-Rite, pretty common in the midwest. The door maker does sell springs, but it doesn't seem worth the hassle to me. To minimize breakage, spray on a coating of old fashioned cosmoline or similar protectant. We always replace both springs if one breaks, seems like a good way to save extra labor when the other gives up. YMMV
Joe
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Jake wrote:

If you keep keep the springs soaked in oil(I use 30 streight weight oil) They seem to last longer. Oncew a year I just rub oil on springs with a piece of rag. In almost 40 year I had one broken spring. When it happened I replaced both. The guy who replaced them told me about using oil.
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Jake wrote:

It's vital that you have a proper set of bars that fit the holes in the spring flanges and are long enough to provide the leverage you'll need. You will need to wind them about 7 revolutions.
The place that sells you replacement springs will need to see the old one(s) since there are several different gauges of wire, the length of the coil, and right or left-hand wind matters.
I've been through it several times on my door and for neighbors and I am always relieved to get it over with. Scary job but do-able.
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Jake wrote:

I paid companies many times to replace them. The last 2 breaks, I did it myself. I agree with the other comments here. I have heard all the horror stories and was always afraid to do it. But, it wasn't that bad. You do have to be careful. BTW, in my area, the only place that stocks the springs is Ace Hardware. Go figure!
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I've done it several times. You can buy the springs online, but by the time you pay for shipping, you're probably better off buying them from a garage door company.
First, invest a a REAL set of cranking bars. Don't just cut steel rod like some of the web sites tell you. You can buy a professional set online for less than $20. Then put the bars in place and release the set screws on the good spring. Count how many revolutions it takes to remove it--you'll need to wind the new springs by the same amount. Take both springs with you when you buy new ones. Get springs with the cones already on them. It's not fun to try to get the old ones off.
Also buy new lift cables and bottom brackets. A new set of cables should cost you about $15 retail. I replace the bottom brackets if there's ANY sign of rust. Brackets cost about $3 each.
Take digital photos of the set up before you disassemble and keep track of where all the bolts came from.
Finally, wear leather gloves and eye protection in the spring breaks.
The advise on oiling is good advice. Just don't over-do it. Excess oil attracts dust and dirt and then it grinds away at the springs. However, oil and dirt is still better than plain old rust chewing up the springs.
so these springs apparently break about every 5 to 7 years and one of my 2 springs

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thanks for all the replies
looks I'll buy these as they are available indeed locally at ACE, though the local stores initially wanted $10 per spring extra, online price 49.99
PRIME-LINE PRODUCTS/SLIDE-CO GD12231 SPRING TORSION 32" LEFT WIND WHITE
PRIME-LINE PRODUCTS/SLIDE-CO GD12230 SPRING TORSION 32" RIGHT WIND WHITE
https://www.acehardwareoutlet.com /(42ggyfjr1us3xa45vxyxokmt)/ProductDetails.aspx?SKUP64001
https://www.acehardwareoutlet.com /(42ggyfjr1us3xa45vxyxokmt)/ProductDetails.aspx?SKUP64068
49.99 each (left/right)
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