Garage Door Spring Rips Garage Apart

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Well for one thing, they're a superior system. and for another thing, when they break, they don't tear shit up.
--
Steve Barker







"DerbyDad03" < snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net> wrote in message
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On Jul 7, 2:30 pm, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

After an about a week's absence, a coworker came into work with a face that looked like it had been beaten with a bat. In fact, it had been beaten with a garage door spring that let go as he was walking through the garage. Luckily, his son heard a strange sound from the garage and went out to find his dad on the floor - broken, bleeding and barely concious.
His face was one ugly mess.
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On Sat, 07 Jul 2007 13:30:43 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote: <snip?

Extension springs should always have a second, separate piece of wire rope running through the middle of the spring and secured solidly at each end with a separate screw eye (not the one holding the spring. This is called a spring keeper, and it keeps the spring from flying loose if it breaks or comes free from the cable or attachment point. Pick the attachment points so the spring can slide along the keeper as it extends and contracts.
HTH,
Paul
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On Sat, 07 Jul 2007 15:31:41 -0400, Paul Franklin

OK, so what you are saying is the cable goes thru the inside of the springs coil and attaches somewhere to the garage frame, right? This makes sense. If there is a picture on a website that would help so I know if this cable goes straight or what.....
Buying a new door is not in the budget, and I sort of like my old wooden one. These fiberglass doors are ugly. I will replace the springs and cables, but that still dont account for metal failure since anything can break at any time. I do like the idea of these extra cables.
Thanks
Andy
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On Jul 7, 3:46 pm, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

-- If there is a picture on a website that would help so I know if this cable goes straight or what.....
See page 4:
http://www.clopaydoor.com/publicfiles/StndrdExtSpringAssemblyInstruct.pdf
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wrote:

That's just what I was looking for. Thanks !!!! Andy
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On Sat, 07 Jul 2007 15:31:41 -0400, Paul Franklin

I had a spring break 2 weeks ago. The spring keeper prevented any damage. Replacing both springs took me less than an hour. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Retired Shop Rat: 14,647 days in a GM plant. Now I can do what I enjoy: Large Format Photography
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I had one break as I closed the door from the inisde. It splintered a 2X6 . Then and there I came up with idea of running the extra cable thru the spring. I posted this same info on this site several years ago to warn people of the danger of that kind of door opener. Jack
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On Sat, 07 Jul 2007 13:30:43 -0500, andy wrote:

Saftey cable through it if it's one that hangs with a pulley on the end.
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On Sat, 07 Jul 2007 13:30:43 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

I've had both springs on my main door break and each time it punched thru the sheetrock.
I heated the end with a blow torch and put a new 'end' on it and have had no trouble since I did the work. That tells me that when they originally made the springs, they must have weakened the metal more than I weakened the metal.
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ValveJob wrote:
<snipped>

I've done the same thing several times and my "new end loops" never fail.
Looking at new extension springs it appears that the end loops come off the spring with a rather sharp small radius bend.
All the breaks I've experienced occured right at that bend which looks neat, but is an obvious stress increaser.
I make my bends with a generous radius. They don't look as great, but they don't break.
Just my .02,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

Proper installation of extension-style door springs calls for retainer cables which are threaded the length of the spring. The cable is secured to the front and rear of the rail supports (not to the spring itself) and are usually about 3/32" - 1/8" diameter aircraft-style cable. The idea is to keep the spring from becoming a ballistic missile should the spring separate. I've found that every replacement spring I've bought over the past ten years has come with the retainer cable and included instructions on how to install them. Most likely you would be better off replacing all of the springs at one go and installing the retainers but you could probably buy the cable separately along with the proper clamps to secure them and install on all the springs.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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I ran garage door cable through each of the springs, and attached the ends to eye hooks in the studs as well as the frames. This will keep the spring contained ... at least will limit the travel it may take.

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Working on a garage door is incredibly dangerous. Even pros often get hurt. Consider hiring a pro for this job. Wayne Dalton stores fix all brands in my area and are very reasonable.
Watch out for ads in the phone book that advertise $ 29.95 service charge in a full page ad. A well dress guy will show up and tell you you need $1000 worth of parts.

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BULLSHIT BULLSHIT BULLSHIT
Art wrote:

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