Garage Door Spring

Today, my garage door torsion spring broke. Is this a job for a typical DIY, or should I call a pro?
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Torsion springs are hazardous to your health. It is time for a pro.
Charlie

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wrote:

Might help you decide after reading how one guy did it: http://www.truetex.com/garage.htm
FWIW, I'd hire it out.
--
Luke
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===============Guess it really comes down to "who is a typical" DIY individual...
I installed my own on all 5 bays in my garages without any problems at all... pretty simple to do... like all things the energy you wind into the springs can do a number on you if you are not working safely but that can be said about nailing a picture up in the bedroom also...
Bottom line is call and see what a door company would charge and see if your time is that valuable to you....
Bob G.
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What he said
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On Mon, 13 Jun 2005 15:47:06 -0400, Bob G.

Yep. I haven't had a torsion spring die on me yet. But I have the link I posted, and the name of a good door company, for that eventuality.
--
Luke
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Your toolkit for this repair is two items: the Yellow Pages, and a MasterCard.
Extension springs are easy DIY jobs. Torsion springs... not if you haven't done it before.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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If you have to ask, it is time for a pro! Greg
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Patch wrote:

There is nothing to it if you know what you are doing, recognize the power of the wound up springs, and work safely (that means having the correct tools (about $10).
I suggest that you have a pro install the first time and that you watch what he does. Then you will be prepared to fix the next broken spring and know how to adjust your spring tension as the springs age.
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Patch wrote:

P.R.O. They will make it look easy, but don't fool yourself. Besides, Keep the economy rolling...
--
Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
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CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert wrote:

I almost broke my finger once. Never again. Also if one side broke, I'd have both sides replaced. Rub the new springs with oil soaked rag. Dry running springs shortens the life. I was told by the door guy. Tony
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will increase its lifetime...Rust prevention ? I just do not know, or I am not awake enough this morning to really think.....
Other that I also find it hard to imagine how a torsion spring would break in normal operation...
Bob G.
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