Garage door opener safety lights

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Quote? My owners manual is long gone years ago.
Harry K
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wrote:

In the manual twice actually http://www.chamberlain.com/CatalogResourcesV3/en-us/shared/files/tucmanuals/114A4242.pdf
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far better to leave the sensors functional , if a neighbor kid happens to get hurt or killed:(
A touchpad outside takes care of shutting the ndoor and is super convenient, plus they are wireless:)
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wrote:

I'd sue the parents for letting a kid near my garage. Sorry, we have no neighbor kids under 14 anyway.

So is the one inside. I have a keypad outside, but you have to hit a code instead of one button. Both are out of reach for little kids.
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not only can a child die, but the law suits, where homeowners insurance will likely not cover you, if you intentially disabled the safety system, but you could lose all your assets and future earnings, let alone your reputation in your community.....
its far easier and better to use the designed in safety system
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My old door has no lights. Don't all have two safety modes. I'm not going to stick my foot under it, but I know it works on small objects. It will stop and reverse.
Greg
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On 5/30/2013 10:47 PM, gregz wrote:

Quite true, IF the down/up pressure is properly adjusted. Properly adjusted, it would be difficult to injure anyone with a closing door unless, perhaps, they were laying on their back with the their neck exposed to the closing door, or maybe had a knife pointed downward so that the closing door would drive it home.
Then again, I can see where that closing door - regardless of the downward pressure could possible scuff up the tops of your shoes. Perhaps that's the real reason the Consumer Products Safety Commission is so involved in this... A government commission seeking to continue its existence by doing something, anything to justify themselves.
Look at the Highway Safety folks. They have us wearing seatbelts and have reduced DUI's tremendously. Great! Now, to justify their continued existence, they think it would be great to ban drivers from even sniffing a cork before getting behind the wheel. Busy work!
If successful, the next thing will be arresting folks for THINKING about having a drink if they are even talking about driving somewhere<g>
My mother and father and long dead; I'm still alive and reasonably successful in life. I don't need a Nanny!
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Especially since there is no reason not to despite attempts by the irresponsible to drea up reasons.
Harry K
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HK-
Some seem focused on the safety light system but if one exaimes the totality of garage door operation & related injuries, one might get a different & broader point of view.
check out stats for 2007
http://www.garagedoorchildsafety.com/injury_report.html
seems like the safety light system really only addresses a small portion of door related injuries
Description          Estimated USA Total Description 1. Pinch/Crush Section Joints         7557        Fingers caught between section joints, includes amputations, avulsions, etc. 2. Falling Doors          2102        Door fell for whatever reason 3. DIY          1610        Person working on a door 4. Sharp Edges          805        Lacerations from door hardware or tracks 5. Glass          313        Lacerations from garage door window glass 6. Spring           313        Spring injuries 7. Broken Door          224        Miscellaneous injuries due to doors needing repairs 8. Other Entrapment          179        Half of these were fingers caught between rollers and tracks 9. Race To Beat The Door          134        People trying to get through the opening before the door closed 10. Riding Door          89        Children riding the door Total      13325
This study is about the "door system" regardless of whether it is electric or manual CPSC’s National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) is a national probability sample of hospitals in the U.S. and its territories.
Seems that as useful as the safety light system may or may not be.... the safest thing to do is to avoid getting close to a moving door. Which tends to reinforce Ed's comment that the manual suggest not walking under (near?) a moving door.
Kinda like.... it's hard to get run over by a parked car.
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But those statistics are wrong, especially in the case of pinched fingers. I got my finger pinched badly by a closing door but didn't report it. :)
Reality though is that I had the GDO disconnected and was closing it manually.
As with almost anything people can get hurt in ways undreamed of by the designers.
Harry K
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A much better safety system.... teach kids to stay away from a moving door.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8885959 Abstract not full report
Automatic garage door openers: hazard for children. Kriel RL, Gormley ME Jr, Krach LE, Luxenberg MG, Bartsh SM, Bertrand JR. Source Department of Pediatrics, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN 55415, USA. Abstract OBJECTIVES: Despite significant advances in automatic garage door opener design, automatic garage door openers continue to severely injure or kill children. In this investigation, we sought to determine the frequency and circumstances of accidents that have caused severe injury or death to children. We also tried to develop a means by which homeowners can evaluate their door openers.
METHODS: We present the histories of three children severely injured or killed by automatic garage door openers. We reviewed national data of similar accidents primarily published by the US Product Safety Commission and Underwriters Laboratories. Also, we evaluated 50 automatic door openers for safety of operation. The reversing mechanisms of door openers were tested using a cardiopulmonary resuscitation mannequin, a roll of paper towels, and a block of wood.
RESULTS: In the United States, at least 85 children have had permanent brain injury or have died since 1974 as a result of accidents involving automatic door openers. A review of circumstances of the accidents illustrates that accidents are caused both by use of the openers by children and by faults in design. Most accidents have occurred when children have found access to the activation devices and have been entrapped under closing doors that failed to reverse. However, in one case, an adult activated the opener and left the premises before the door completely closed. Our evaluation of 50 garage door openers showed that although 88% percent reversed when encountering a block of wood, 40% failed to reverse when coming down on a supine, child-sized cardiopulmonary resuscitation mannequin.
CONCLUSIONS: Automatic garage door openers pose a serious risk of severe injury or death to children. It is probable that many doors would not reverse if they came down on a young child. Therefore, we have devised a way for homeowners to test their door openers that closely mimics our evaluations using the mannequin by using a large roll of paper towels. If the door fails to reverse using this test, we suggest that homeowners disconnect their openers and operate the doors manually until the openers are serviced or replace their automatic openers with one that meets the latest Underwriters Laboratory standards. We also have other recommendations regarding the safe operation of the doors, including improving the safety standards for openers in apartment complexes. Compliance with these recommendations should reduce the number of injuries to children caused by garage door openers.
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HK-
Besides "punch & run" is a practice learned and perfected many years ago by many of us. In some installations, I have to "punch, run & hop" to avoid the safety lights. :( Much less safe for me than "punch & run".
I mount the manual controls high enough to only allow adults to activate them.
Mounting the manual
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No good, I'm on dialup and downloading hat would take forever.
So briefly describe what the danger is of punching the button as you exit. I do it all the time also.
Harry K
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wrote:

So do I. But just like you should not use a hair dryer outside in the pool, you should not hit the button and walk under the closing door.
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You still haven't given a reason why. Apparently you have read that source you posted, cut and paste would answer the question.
So again. What danger is there in hitting the button on your way out?
Harry K
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wrote:

I gave you a link. It did not allow me to copy the section.
Pretty obvious what the danger is. Door coming down, you trip and fall and it hits you.
That is the stuff that keeps lawyers busy writing manuals.
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You'd have to be one hell of some kind of crippled klutz to have the door hit and injure you after you push the button and run out the door. I'll bet a couple of orders of magnitude less probability than getting injured in the bathtub or when going down stairs. Maybe we should stop using those first..
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So you can't even paraphrase what that manual says. With one foot outside he door before yiou enven push the button momentum is going to carry you clear. Even a massiver heart attack instantly dead the momentum will have you clear of the door.
Try again.
You still haven't given a sensible answer to why you disable the safety lights. Harry K
Harry K
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wrote:

I did tell what it said. If you don't think my answer is suitable, get off your lazy ass and look it up. I personally don't give a damn if you believe me, or if you follow the advice of the manual (I don't).
Probably every manual of every door operator has similar CYA instructions. I know the doors at work even came with warning labels not to walk under a closing door.
I never said it was sensible, I just said the advice exists.
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If you notice that last comment had nothing to do with the danger. It was pointing out that you have never given a "sensible" reason for disabling the sensors.
Harry K
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