Garage door is off track

Page 1 of 2  

Garage door is off track will not open or close Is this a do it yourself job or should I call a repairman?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It might help to know more about the door and how badly it's off the track. If it's completely off, you have a torsion spring, and you had to ask the question, call the repairman. If it's just the top pulley, you can often coax the wheels back into the track. If it's a torsion spring and the cable is loose, SOMETIMES you can get the cable back around the pulley without major hassle. It'll likely come back off, though. Again, for anyone to help they'll need to know more.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bob callaway wrote:

If there are big springs, either torsion or coil I would think about a repairman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you have to ask, you need a repairman.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bob callaway wrote:

How many rollers have come off? Are the spring cables still in tact? If the spring is not screwed up you can often fix the rollers by either unbolting the track and slipping the roller back in, or by removing the roller bracket from the door reinsert the roller and feed it through the bracket before re-attaching it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 23:17:22 -0500, "bob callaway"

What they are saying is don't mess with the springs. They can kill you, it seems. Post with more details if you are still thinking of doing this yourself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote:

It "seems"? There isn't even an indication whether it's a single or double door. Have you ever tried to lift a garage door without the springs attached? A wooden or steel door could kill you if it crashed down on you, or take a foot or toes off real easy. Do you even know why a door has to be open to install springs? Any idea how to safely KEEP a door open while it's being worked on or whether it will be necessary? There are many dangers and safety methods that should be followed. Then you're still left with the job of balancing the door properly. No, most with experience are talking about a lot more than messing with the springs, which is likely to be necessary, depending on the actual state of the door. It might be as simple as readjusting the tracks, but that can be VERY dangerous if that door gets away from you and wants to flail at the hinges on that side while the other side is still captive (until it starts to fall, anyway); then it may come completely out of the tracks. And if it's s torsion spring type; well ... either way it could get interesting if the springs were still attached.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It does??? Many doors would be IMPOSSIBLE to replace the springs on with the door open.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote:

Educate me please: I'm reasonable.
Any installation I'm aware of, the door needs to be UP to relieve the pressure on the springs. Disconnect the push/pull connecton and slide the door the rest of the way back and the cabling will hang loose for you to work on. When a door is closed, the springs are under maximum tension. Otherwise they wouldn't lift the door. And you'll never find an easy way to work with tensioned springs - talk about cocking a door in the frame!
What am I missing?
HTH,
Twayne`
Any idea how to safely KEEP a door open while it's being

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Torsion springs are mounted above the door. With the door open you can't get to them, so they have to be worked on with the door open and full tension on them. That's why they're so dangerous. Better springs, but more dangerous to work on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 16:19:20 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

I think you mean closed, instead of "the door open".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The second one, yes. Sorry, here is what I should have said:
Torsion springs are mounted above the door. With the door open you can't get to them, so they have to be worked on with the door closed and full tension on ^^^^^^ them. That's why they're so dangerous. Better springs, but more dangerous to work on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote:

No, he's right in what he said. In many cases too, you cannot open the door and get sufficient room to use the winding tools because the tracks are too short to allow it. And it's a bear of a job to get the door raised with one spring broken.
HTH,
Twayne`
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote:

Actually, after consideration, I'm going to say you're mostly right about this. It's not unusual for the track system to not allow sufficient movement of the door to the point where you will have room to use the winding/unwinding rods to wind/unwind the springs; it takes about 3' of space. The door will often cock and jam istelf all the way up with a spring gone on one side, especially if it's a wooden, heavy door, should you try to manually lift it. IF it's light enough to manually lift. It's been years since I've touched one and that was back in Chgo and a 2-stall wide door of my neighbor's. What we did was unwind the spring on the good side far enough to let one man be able to lift on the side with the broken spring and get it to go smoothly. It took a man on the good spring side too, since we relieved the pressure. And of course disconnecting the opener from the door. Another retired neighbor helped us and used to work for a garage door installation company. He had us raise the now basically unsprung door to its max travel and prop it safely so it couldn't return. Then in about 5 minutes we dropped the topmost casters out of the top door section and let the top section hang down on its hinges, which let us move the door far enough to be able to use the bars to finish putting the new springs on. Normally both springs should be replaced at the same time. We put the new springs on, approximately equalized the torsion between the sides, and manually let the door down slowly a step at a time using a come-along as a safety wire. When it was down all the way we finished the torsion settings, reconnected the opener and were done. Took about an hour IIRC, with lots of talk & jokes as we went along. Of course, we spent the previous evening for about 3 six packs planning it out. Doing those adjustements when the door is down is scary business; if you slip and lose a hold on one of those adjuster bars it's going to become a missile if it comes out of the holes made for it. I have noticed recently that torsion sprung doors have longer tracks on them; that's interesting.
For whatever reason it's not near as difficult to lift a door with tension springs. It's easy to thread the wire so you can pull on it to lift the door on the side where the spring broke and just let the other side follow. You don't have to go too far before the weight of the door gets really heavy though. Come-alongs to the rescue again works well. Personally I wouldn't touch a torsion sprung door at all anymore but hey, I'm an old man now! They're just too danged dangerous, door up OR down! I have replaced my own tension springs twice over the years though without any problems. I got the idea to use come-alongs from watching a garage door repairman in Chgo changing some tension springs at a friend's house. Someone said torsion springs were "better" but I don't really see it. They're more expensive, use practically the same springs as on tension openers and are a lot harder to work with. You don't get back any ceiling space because there still has to be clearances for the tracks and the door to move into when it's up. They also require a much stronger header over the garage door since all of the torsion has to be worked against in that one small area.
HTH,
Twayne`
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 13:24:25 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Maybe extension springs? Torsion springs would certainly be difficult to replace with the door open. ;-)

Vice Grips on the track by a set of wheels is a common way to lock the door in place. With the door all the way up there wouldn't be a lot of force on them.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote:

Nuh, uh; both are full extended when the door is down. Also, with a sectional door, the door is going to bow and flop down like shutters if the springs are removed with the door down, and worse if one end of a section is out of the track, it'll completely fall to the floor. Now that I understand you're only imagining things, I see where you're coming from. I would suggest you go look at a few different garage doors and watch how they operate. The purpose of the springs is to LIFT the door, so what positions could they be in other than extended? Same only more dangerous for torsion springs over the doors. Don't do it; it's very dangerous and the springs can be lethal.

That's one way some do it; and many that do it also deform their track from the grips, or if/when the door should slide forward and hit the vise grips, which are awfully easy to dislodge when hit from the sides of the jaws. That's a poor way to do it, and can cause damage to the tracks by bending them out of shape; try it and see how poorly vice grips can get hold of anything without crushing the edges of the track or pulling the bottom into the raceway. Oh, you could leave them looser, but then they can be more easily dislodged by the inertia of a moving door.

Unless you have something meaningfuil and logical to discuss/debate, I think I'm through with resonding to you in particular.
HTH,
Twayne`
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Obviously (what a maroon).

Huh? The door is connected together at the rollers. If they're out of the track you're not likely replacing the spring. Maybe you would.

I suggest you do the same. To replace extension springs (always in pairs), one leaves the door in the *up* position, so that there is little or no tension on them. They're a snap to replace since they're not storing any (much) energy. This would be a good idea for a torsion spring too, if not for the fact that the spring is not accessible with the door up.

Someone has to do it. It's easy to replace extension springs. The OP didn't specify.

If you're a moron, perhaps you'll squish the track. Sensible people would grip the flats and not mess with the *ROUNDED* roller race.

I did. You just cannot understand.

Good. I don't need an idiot. Bye.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

TENSION springs need the door to be open, which means the springs are retracted - torsion springs need the door closed, which means the springs are "loaded" - because they are above the door and impossible to reach with the door open. They also wind OVER the "axle", They ARE dangerous to work with if you don't know what you are doing.
I've likely replacesd a dozen of them, and adjusted several dozen over the years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Twayne wrote the following:

The purpose of the springs is to COUNTERBALANCE the weight of the door, whether opening or closing.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Since I haven't got first hand knowledge, I have to use some qualifier. Either "It seems" or "I've read". I warned him. I'm not his mother.

Maybe, but what does it matter? What do you think the OP expects out of 3 lines?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.