Garage door bottom weather strip

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Most roofing nails are galvanized, short, and have fairly smooth shanks. Roofers routinely have to pull them by the hundreds when replacing a roof (granted, they're usually just driven into 1/2" plywood). I'm betting they'll come out rather easily.
It's not absolutely critical the nails come out. Pry them out as far as you can. If the head breaks off or the nail just won't come out, yank the weather stripping off, then cut off what you can and hammer the remaining nail into the bottom of the door. The old nails will be covered by the new weatherstripping anyway.

You can get screws with wide heads, or simply use washers under the screws.

I don't think it will be as bad as it sounds. If you use tape or something to hold the weather strip up, you'll have one hand to hold the nail and a second to swing the hammer. Roofing nails have big heads and are usually short so they drive quickly. It may take a few nails before you get the hang of swinging at that angle, but you'll find a rhythm that works rather quickly.
Of course, an air nailer would make that job super quick and easy.

I would find the middle of the weatherstripping and start in the center of the door. Secure it in the middle then lay it out towards each end of the door. You shouldn't need to put tension on it, other than enough to keep it straight. Hopefully you'll end up with a bit extra on each end that you can trim off when you're finished. If the weatherstripping is a bit short on each end, you might be able to stretch it slightly to reach both ends.
If you start at one end, you may end up too short at the other end, or overstretch it unnecessarily.
Good luck,
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On 7/19/2015 12:37 PM, HerHusband wrote:

CY: Well, they did all come out. Some less easy.

CY: I nearly did that, sink the old nails in. But, it worked out okay.

CY: Could have done that. The weather strip came with some galvanized roofing nails, so I used em.

CY: Sure, just need to set up the compressor, wait for it to come up to pressure, and drag the hose around. Uh, quick....

CY: Might try center, on the next one. The garage door du jour is 10 feet, and I had 16 foot of weather strip. Ended up with some left over, which I saved for another job. Mild tension seemed to help, the weather strip ended up nicely on, and no obvious sags or droops.

CY: Thanks for the luck. I needed it! And the job went reasonably well.
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"Stormin Mormon" wrote in message
I've been asked to replace garage door lower gasket, for a friend. Wooden garage door. Looks like the existing rubber is held on with about 50 roofing nails.
Any hints or ideas to get the job done? I suspect pulling the nails will be a LOT of work. Hammering upwards is a LOT of work also.
I'm going to bring two or three versions of hammer, and a pair of country western fence pliers (you know the one with the dog that died?).
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On 7/18/2015 5:36 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Find out that the reason I'm replacing the weather strip is that the garage is below a living room for the back apartment. Cold air blew in during the winter, and made the floor cold in the apartment. I hadn't thought of that, but it does make sense.
Anyhow, the job started with the tear off. I used the claw of a claw hammer to pry betwen the nails, and the rubber ripped off in chunks.
Much of the rubber stayed under the heads of the nails, and made it dificult to get a hammer claw under the nails. More pounding and prying to get the rubber out from under the nails heads.
Most of the nails were bdly rusted. I tried a claw hammer (the nail heads bend, takes three bites and yanks with the hammer claw to get the nail out). The diags pliers I brought were okay, but not great. I decided not to bring the fence pliers, though maybe I ought have.
So, the nails came out. I unrolled the new weather strip and put it hanging over the right end about three inches. One nail. Stretch a bit and put in another nail about three feet from the start. Used my fingers to line up the ede of the door and the corner fold of the weather strip.
One nail about every three feet, just by eye. Went back and used the head of the hammer as a mesaure, so I put the nails about every six inches. Managed to bend over one nail. Could not get it out (part of the nail head broke off while I pried on it). I sank another nail right next to it, covered the bent nail, mostly.
Cut the ends of he strip with a razor nkife. Close the door, and trim the ends to fit. Use the customer's broom and dust pan to seweeep up the nails. Pick ed up some of the nails with a telescoping magnet.
He was pleased to see a good seal, and less light seen from inside. I actually got paid.
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