Garage, Concrete Slab Floor/Wall; Gap...


Hi.
I've an unheated garage many years old. One side the concrete floor meets the wall (wood beams) just fine; but on the other side a gap of about an inch or two can be seen along a length of at least 20 feet. Critters see it too and worm their way into the shelter...
First - is this gap indicative of a greater problem in the garage (the wall is solid and straight) and secondly, how can I seal this gap...? Add concrete...? Patch with 'hardware cloth'...?
Thanks for ideas...
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After all these years the settling has probably stabilized, so filling the gap with mortar mix as needed ought to work just fine. Check some of the books on masonry work for good ideas to stuff the mortar into the gap. HTH
Joe
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"waves2ya" wrote

How many? Also is it attached to the house or 'free standing'? Both make a difference.

If attached to the house, much more of a problem and a more solid 'fix' needed.

Depends on how old it is. Say, 20-30 years, and hasnt changed in last 5-10, not a problem.

Hardware cloth will not work more than a very short time. While another suggested mortar (a very possible solution) it may not be easy to apply depending on the design of the fill area and my be pretty unsightly both based on that design, and your skill level. If your skills with it arent pretty good, you will create a potential 'hack looking job' that can drive off a buyer if it's attached to the house. Less so if a free standing unit and not apparent from outside of it.
I can think of several simple fixes that would work in most climates but they make presumptions on the construction of the 'wall'. Will work for attached garage or free standing sorts.
1. If it's pretty much a bare wall with studs on the inside and some sort of exterior siding, get some of the blue foam largish squares and cut panels in that about 1ft tall and run them down to the floor using 3 layers at least. Set these in a bottom of thick layered caulking. Over the studs, you may want to add that sort of board with the holes in it you can add hooks to for tools, floor to 'top'. - This presumes no real drywall etc is there already, water doesnt come in the gap due to landscaping or area - If presumptions are right, the smart thing is to insulate all the way up as it's real easy to just add some rolled 'pink insulation' between the studs at this stage then add the simple 'pegboard' (I believe that is the name of it). You may want to do the whole garage with it.
2. If you do get water flow in there, you wouldnt have drywall left so we can rule that out but you need a proper water barrier. Mortar is good but you'll want to cover it with 'peg board' as in #1 above unless you know how to do it really well.
3. If you get no water, and do have something like drywall or perhaps paneling of some sort, I'd fill the gap tightly with thin 'shim wood' and loads of caulk all coating everything, then put up a baseboard on the inside. The wood in mind is sold in 6-8ft lengths and you'd add it 'longwise' (same orientation as the wall).
Add more information on the circumstances and we can help narrow this down for you better ok? Nice folks here but there were too many variables left to really answer.
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Is detached from house; nothing structurally has changed in many years; dry - but wall in uninsulated (no drywall, etc.)...
Thanks, again.
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"waves2ya" wrote

Ok, option 1 seems best. Blue filler first along the wall to the floor (can get away with just 6 inches but make many layers of it and set in silicone caulk) then if you want it better looking, the insulation is easy to add. You just need a staple gun and a few minutes to do it. The paper side goes towards the 'heat source' (outside in this case). Then, takes about 10 mins to nail up the pegboard which comes in sizes just like drywall etc.
If the wall itself is thicker (sounds like just plank siding of normal sort, like 1 inch or less) you may need to fill it a bit with either shim wood (also sold in very thin sections which will fit) or more of the foam board. Be careful it doesnt show 'ugly' outside and use lots and lots of caulk all over it.
Getting closer?
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