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Lots of people do stupid things for years and never get hurt. It don't make it right. Do not use PVC for air!!! Greg
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Francis Rowe wrote:

That's like saying grandma smoked three packs a day and lived to be 90. It's possible that you will have no problems, but it is also possible that it will kill you.

here's one example of possible problems: http://www.osha.gov/dts/hib/hib_data/hib19880520.html
Here's an explanation of how to run piping correctly, along with the explanation of why you should NOT use PVC for compressed air: http://www.oldsmobility.com/air-compressor-piping.htm
Ken
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On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 09:07:16 GMT, "Francis Rowe"

Lets not get hysterical but you could put your eye out.
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Not trying to get into a fight here, but PVC was suggested to me 8 years ago by a friend who was a professional mechanic. Is there a reason a pipe that's rated to handle 400 pounds liquid can't be trusted with 100 pounds of gas?
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YES Gas is easily compressed and will expand with great force when there is a rupture. Liquid under pressure barely compresses and if it lets go, there will be very little movement of the container and shrapnel.
Where I worked many years ago, we used to test heating coils with air in a tank. They would fill them with 50 psi in a tank of water. When high pressure units were built, they were hydrostatic tested up to 3000 psi because of the safety factor of pumping liquid under pressure. The were bench tested as it was not considered dangerous
Your friend may be a professional mechanic, but that does not mean he knows about plastics, air pressure and the resulting hazards. OSHA does not allow PVC, nor do the makers of the tubing allow it. A Google search will find a lot of information on the subject.
I understand there is a new material that is acceptable for air use but do not recall the specifications. Rubber hose rated for air can also be used.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/




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JerseyMike wrote:

Guess you could use short sections of air hose w/ tees but would be a lot neater to just run a drop line w/ black pipe...remember to come off header w/ two ells, first pointing up to minimize water and to provide a drain somewhere...
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On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 16:54:25 GMT, "JerseyMike"

Black 1" pipe is extremely Cheap...not at all hard to install...
Bob Griffiths
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Bunch of T fittings, and air hose?
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Christopher A. Young
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