Gap Under GarageDoor


I have a 2.5" gap under on small area of my double garage door. I can't seem to find a bottom door sealer over 1.5" thick. Where can I find a garage door "foam material" that will be 2.5" thick and will compress completely in the areas of the door where there is no gap? Thanks for any help!
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A picture would help. Is the gap all the way across? Then you need to adjust how far the door closes. Is the gap at one end? Then you need to adjust the door mounts so it closes evenly against the bottom. Is you floor so uneven that you have a 2.5" gap in one spot? That sucks.
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You're not going to find anything like that, because it's the wrong solution for the problem. Home Depot sells a lot of band-aid solutions that encourage people to do bad things to their homes, but even they know that what you're trying to do is beyond ridiculous.
Do you put band-aids on bullet wounds?
The correct solution is to fix the hole in the floor.
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On Jun 4, 2:26 pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Agreed... Patching the broken edge of the concrete slab floor of the garage is not all that a mysterious thing to do...
~~ Evan
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the garage is not all that a mysterious thing to do...
There could be other reasons why the floor is level and flat.
Obvious holes can be patched. But it's not unreasonable to apply a "filler strip" to the edge of the door which is cut so that there is a uniform and bridgable gap. THAT gap you close with weather stripping.
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"filler
What I pictured was not a hole in the floor but more likely a set of tracks that need to be adjusted so the flat bottom edge of the door will hit the flat door. Alternatively there is something stopping the door on one side that the OP has not noticed.
It is doubtful the original owner would have accepted the concrete job that far off.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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Roger Shoaf wrote:

Mine was done poorly. The concrete dips down in the center of the door. Didn't realize it when I did it, but the opener actually crushed a little of the steel door on one side so now it is sealed in the center too. A strong door too, steel on outside and inside with insulation in the middle. Yes, I backed off the closing pressure adjustment!
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Upholstery foam. + duct tape, proly. They can cut upholstery foam (white, yellow-ish) pretty accurately.
However, I sort of agree with mkirsch -- 2.5" is pushing the definition of a gap. But, if you really can't fix the floor/foundation, foam will at least fix the air/humidity/infiltration problem, for a while. If this is going to be a longterm solution, think of ways to weather proof the foam, by wrapping it in 3 mil plastic or some such.
They make a sealing rubber strip (not foam) that you might want to put on the bottom of the foam, as well. Almost looks like "channel".
You might even be able to scavenge this foam from cheapie mattresses, or old couches, etc.
You'll want to counterbore this material for a screw and 1/2"-1" washer, and screw from the bottom. As you do this, you proly won't get a perfect "mate" between the foam and the door, but no matter, when the door closes all will be fine.
Another long-shot material possibility is rubber tubing, such as used on industrial rollers etc, which is a long shot bec this is very expensive material, but you might find some in a dump, or factory, etc.
I happen to have a bunch from an old machining job, and it's great stuff. Just loosely stuff it with cloth or old foam scraps, etc, just to give it some body. You wouldn't be able to counterbore this stuff, but a flat head screw and washer from the bottom would still be the way to install it.
--
EA



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