Galvanized to PVC

Opened the water supply valve for my backyard water spigot only to discover a leak. Pipe is galvanized extending about 24" above ground level with a 180 degree elbow to which a standard valve is attached. Water leak found in the threads where the elbow connects to the stand up pipe.
Being at least 50 years old the connection is rather corroded. Two pipe wrenches wouldn't budge it. Have to be careful as I don't wish to crack the pipe below ground level.
Two questions:
1) Any easy way to free up that elbow?
2) Assuming answer to #1 is no, would it be possible to use a sawzall to cut of the elbow and somehow transition over to pvc?
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Jim wrote:

If pipe gets too corroded, the pipe just squashes when you try to hold it with a pipe wrench with enough force to loosen a rusted joint.

There are PVC compression couplings. The cheapest way might be a 2" length of rubber hose with an I.D. equal to the O.D. of the pipe, and 2 hose clamps.
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You might have a better chance of opening up a joint underground but I would be thinking about a whole new pipe if the stuff underground is toast too. Do not use a PVC female on a galvanized pipe! Put a galvanized coupler on it and use a male PVC.
The male pipe will start getting rusty and female will end up splitting.
I wish there was a more politically correct way of saying that ;-)
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On Sun, 26 Apr 2009 18:21:42 -0400, against all advice, something compelled snipped-for-privacy@aol.com, to say:

That's a metaphor, yes?
--

Real men don\'t text.



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wrote:

Just a mnemonic to remember the principle, like the stelactite/stelagmite thing. "the mites go up and the tites come down"
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Sounds like a memory thing, to me. Like the stala*C*tites have a C. C for ceiling. stal*G*mites, G for Ground.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Sun, 26 Apr 2009 22:19:03 -0400, against all advice, something
to say:

That's what mnemonic means.
--

Real men don\'t text.

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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Stalactites are stuck tight to the ceiling. Stalagmites might reach the ceiling.
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Please be kind enough to take some pictures of that 180 degree elbow, and post them to a photos hosting site. I'm not sure I've ever seen one of those.
As to freeing up a rotted on elbow, Mapp or acetylene torch, to heat the elbow. And then try the two wrenches while it's still plenty hot. I doubt a fermo connector would work on a water intake. Some threading kits are available to cut new threads into the cut end of a pipe. But, that's risky.
If heat doesn't work, with the two wrenches. Then try heat and then spray the threads with WD-4o till it cools down. sometimes helps. I've also heard of heating it, and then dripping candle wax onto the threads. but with a pipe coming through the floor, that's hard to drip uphill.
--
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On Apr 26, 3:27pm, "Stormin Mormon"

I believe that would be a "pipe cap" ;)
Harry K
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2: Probably best not to try to free it up. Cut the pipe below the elbow, install a "Dressler Coupling" (compression fitting), with a stub of new iron pipe and elbow. I would bother with the PVC.
As someone else said: If you do go to PVC be sure the PVC to iron adapter is a male. Just screwing a female pvc onto iron can split the coupling (I did it and discovered the error after having to dig it up to fix).
Harry K
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Jim wrote:

Can u post pic of "180 degree" elbow ??? ;-)
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Don't be afraid to really romp on it. Collapse the pipe and twist it off if you have to. It will be easier to use a cold chisel and hammer to collapse the pipe threads and peel them away from the inside of the fitting.

A transition will never seal on the rough galvanized. Compression fittings are for smooth pipes. A rubber transition will not withstand the pressure.
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On Apr 27, 8:33am, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

And after you get done butchering a $1.25 fitting you throw it in the trash and buy a new one anyhow.

Perhaps you should be re-educating 60 years of plumbers who have been using them then.
A rubber transition will not withstand

BS and see above.
Harry K
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