Galvanized Pipe

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If you're talking of interior plumbing only, not buried, 40 yr galvanized is pretty unlikely to be so bad as to be unworkable unless you have extremely bad water conditions or other reasons for galvanic corrosion. Signs to look out for would be if you're already having random pinhole leaks, etc., frequently. If not, I'd say your chances are quite good.
Of course, if it's that bad, rethreading really isn't likely going to be an option anyway, as there isn't going to be enough left to thread and have a sufficient wall thickness/strength to make a seal when you try to thread on a new fitting.
It's doable. Whether you'll feel it was worth the money will probably depend on how good access you have to what you need to get to and just a general level of comfort w/ doing repair work...if it seems a stretch to consider, chances are you may regret it. OTOH, if it's just not being familiar w/ PEX itself and you do stuff routinely, it's just a new skill to learn...
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Your WAY better off repacing all the steel pipe.
Start by doing the hot, isolate it from the cold at the hot water tank, this way you still have water for flushing.
Dont try to do everything in one day, do a couple runs and go from there
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Yes, with some advance planning, you can do it. If you plan to do small stages, yes, I can pretty much guarantee one fitting will be a problem. If you plan ahead, lay out the manifolds, perhaps run the lines to the fixtures in advance, you will have only once connection to worry about.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com spake thus:

You can always rent them: when I replumbed my house more than a decade ago, that's exactly what happened to me. I just ran down to the tool rental place, got a couple dies, threaded the pipe and was on my way. Pretty painless.
--
Just as McDonald\'s is where you go when you\'re hungry but don\'t really
care about the quality of your food, Wikipedia is where you go when
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If I was going to do all that work, re-pipe the house First I would replace all the pipe, Second I would use Copper not PEX even if Mice & Rats like it. ( and they will chew threw it) It's just the new cheap housing track way to do things. But what do I know I'm just a plumber.
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Every material has its place. PEX is a great material in the right place. It has been used in Europe for years. If it was up to union plumbers, we'd still be using cast iron pipe. and all houses would be built from stone.
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wrote in message

want. It is cheaper, and faster to install. But now do the contractors pass that savings on ? Now you bash the Unions what dose that have to do with the quality of pipe. But are one of those people that think everybody but you should make minimum wage, have no medical benefits, have no retirement. Even Union wages aren't that much compared to cost of living anymore.
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Not challenging you, I just want to understand. Why is PEX not as good as copper?
-- Doug
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"Cheaper" and "faster to install" sound like good reasons to me...
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

"Cheaper" and "faster" aren't _necessarily_ synonymous w/ "better".
I doubt Sacramento Dave has any real data to back up the contention but is more stating an opinion/prejudice (which in some ways as noted below I share).
The one thing against PEX at this point imo is that it doesn't have the history behind it yet. We'll know in 20, 30, 50, 100 years how good it _really_ is. Personally, my expectation is it won't be as durable for the long run, but that's just one guy's guess. I have a prejudice against it because it just looks cheap in my eye but that has absolutely nothing to do w/ it's actual quality as a plumbing system.
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wrote:

And there's nothing wrong with that method of choosing what you use. I agree with you, I feel that PEX does in fact look cheap, chintzy, and half-assed but I'm still using it because it is so much easier to install.
The way I look at it, if the PEX I've installed lasts 20 years - which I think is reasonable, it will still be a snap to correct it. How much time does it take to install - it takes me less time to get over my fear of "what lurks in the crawlspace" than it does to install it - an hour if I'm feeling particularly jumpy? Will copper survive an earthquake? Quite possibly not, PEX will no problem if done right. Earthquakes are not uncommon where I live.
For those experienced working with copper you all might feel the exact same way. But I'm not experienced with copper, I'd have it installed then spend the next day tryinig in vain to close all the leaky joints because the silver solder didn't flow well. Or I'd spend the next week talking to the insurance agent on why I burned my house down with a propane torch.
So unless I have about 1000+ to pay a plumber to do the job right, I do the same thing every other homeowner does and spend 75 bucks and install PEX (plus the cost of the crimper - if needed).
It's all a matter of what you are more comfortable with. As for my own house. Copper from the meter to the first junction - PEX there on in.
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dpb wrote:

Its already been in common use in Europe for at least 30 years.
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Oh, you are so wrong about what you say. Never did I say unions cause poor quality pipes. I have nothing against making a good wage and good benefits. Tradesmen deserve a good wage.
What I did say was unions do not like to change and modernize. I've worked in many areas where the unions are strong. It is not just about wages, but they can resist change if less labor is involved. I've seen it up close and personal in the Philadelphia area. I've seen unions destroy some very good small businesses also.
Unions were great for the working man back in the 30's and 40's and even into the 50's. But around the mid 60's they started to go to hell. Yes, most unions today suck. Some of the smart ones are now changing and realizing they must work with businesses to create jobs and train skilled workers, not just demand more benefits. They must EARN them. I've been involved with union negotiations and I've seen the leadership sell out the employees for their personal gain.
FWIW, I pay my plumber $55.00/hour.
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Do you use illegals or unlicensed plumbers? Licensed plumbers here charge more like $90-100/hour!
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writes:

He is a master plumber, fully licensed and insured. I'm glad I live here rather that there, wherever you are.
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On Thu, 21 Dec 2006 16:57:27 -0800, "Sacramento Dave"

They must have good water there in Sacramento. Some places have water that eats copper.
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