Fuses in box get hot when using Kenmore Electric Dryer (only on heat cycle)

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No I have two 30A fuses.
Later, Jim
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If the fuses themselves are the only part of the circuit wiring that is getting hot, then the problem has to be either the connection at the fuse holder, the fuse holder itself (somebody mention the latter; not sure about the former) or the fuse bases themselves are dirty/ corroded/loose. Faults in the other connections while an issue to resolve would cause heating local to them, not at the fuses.
As someone else noted, this is not something to leave go unattended.
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Both fuses are cool during Air Only Cycle (I know just one side - 120 should be in use then). When I run a Heat Cycle both fuses get hot, very hot, almost to hot to touch (Yes, I know both 120's are now in play). This is a 3-wire pig-tail.
I will take a closer look at the fuses/holder/wires.

I have stopped using the dryer and I shut the dryer add-on box off.
Cheers, Jim
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door
dead
fuses
one-time
tight
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My concern is that fuses do not wear out nor gain ampacity with age. I would check the wire size to the dryer. If the wire is not rated for 30 amps then you have found your problem.
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Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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I pretty sure the wire is heavy enough, also this dryer and wiring have been in place for maybe 12-15 years or more?
Cheers, Jim
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That would heat the wire, not the fuses themselves...
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wrote:

It would heat the connections, not the wire - and the connection at the fuse holder could be heating even if it is physically tight
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On Jan 19, 11:05pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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On Jan 19, 11:05pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The heat will be generated at the high(er) resistance point(s) -- if the wire were small-enough to be a voltage dropping element in the circuit, it would be a distributed heater (albeit lower resistance than, but similar to the dryer heating element). If the connections are bad somewhere, they'll generate heat at that (those) resistance point(s), not somewhere else.
If there were a stray path to ground it might be possible to draw excess current over the normal load and still be under the fuse ratings. But, any heating effects would still be effected at the point (s) of higher resistance in the circuit. If only the fuse box/fuses are overheating, there has to be a high resistance point there somewhere--high resistance somewhere else can't transfer its I-squared- R losses across the ether to be dissipated elsewhere.
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wrote:

The heat will be generated at the high(er) resistance point(s) -- if the wire were small-enough to be a voltage dropping element in the circuit, it would be a distributed heater (albeit lower resistance than, but similar to the dryer heating element). If the connections are bad somewhere, they'll generate heat at that (those) resistance point(s), not somewhere else.
If there were a stray path to ground it might be possible to draw excess current over the normal load and still be under the fuse ratings. But, any heating effects would still be effected at the point (s) of higher resistance in the circuit. If only the fuse box/fuses are overheating, there has to be a high resistance point there somewhere--high resistance somewhere else can't transfer its I-squared- R losses across the ether to be dissipated elsewhere.
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All the wires are 10 gauge (from the main to the add-on and to the dryer).
The add-on box is rated 30 Amp, and the outlet is rated 50 Amp.
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... Yes, I figured as much. _Sizing_ of the equipment/wiring isn't the problem and this subthread has nothing to do w/ your problem or its root cause.
I simply wanted to correct a misconception that somehow a resistance point somewhere else would be the cause of heating to show up removed from that location--just doesn't work that way because the heat comes from I^2 R losses and is generated at the location of the "R" thru which the "I" passes whether that is localized in a (faulty) connection or distributed in the case of a wire.
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You don't have aluminum wiring, do you?
Joe
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You don't have aluminum wiring, do you?
Joe
No.
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Dryer Box; I took apart the fuse holders and cleaned all contact points (including the fuses) with emery cloth and then with water. One screw assembles each fuse holder locking the holder (threads) and the wire connection bar in place.
I found a corroded connection on one gate/post (when you flip the level on the box). It was on the heater side. It was not to bad, looked like a bit of the copper in the gate had transferred to the post which is more like silver. I also squeezed the gate prongs together to tighten the fit.
I found a major problem inside the outlet box after removing the cover, one side of one of the female prongs was broken. The male side prong (cord side) had some heat damage. I cleaned up the prongs on the cord. Replaced the dryer outlet with a new one. Hooked everything back up, ran the dryer on high heat without clothes for 30 mins, check the fuses - both were just slightly warm, nothing at all like before.
Washed a load, put them in the dryer, opened a beer. Checked the fuses about 20 mins into the load, heater side was hot again! (as it was in the beginning) But the motor side is now just slightly warm! I removed the fuse from the heater side and found some small arc points on the fuse tip and the screw head it contacts. I tightened the screw a bit, took the 30A fuse from the motor side and stuck it in the heater side, put a new 15A in the motor side. (I'm out of 30's, will get new ones tomorrow). I ran the dryer for another 10 mins, checked fuses - both just slightly warm. (Maybe it was not long enough for it to get hot, will run longer tomorrow.)
I may tighten the screw inside the fuse holder a bit more, I didn't want to over do it.
Anyone have an idea how many Amps each side (heater/motor) should draw? I think I need to replace the box, but I would like to make sure the dryer is not the problem.
How about this Meter for checking the Amps? Cen-tech Digital Clamp Meter at http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber308 or this one http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber675
So here's my plan. 1) Buy a new meter, check Amps for both sides, if normal replace fuse box. If not normal, then back to the dryer.......
Cheers, Jim
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Jim2009 wrote:

I've got the $10.00 one. Seems sufficient for checking loads.
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Thanks, I'll get one today.
Cheers, Jim
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I'm not an expert in dryers, but I don't think there is one side for the heater and one side for the motor. I would expect the heater current flows through both legs, providing the heater with 240V. The motor could be 120 and if so, would flow through one leg.
If it were me, I'd replace that box with a breaker as suggested. I would not trust it, regardless of what else you find. And while I was at it, since the main fuse panel is apparently located in a similar environment and by all indications is likely even older, I'd get that replaced by a new breaker panel too.

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wrote:

I'm not an expert in dryers, but I don't think there is one side for the heater and one side for the motor. I would expect the heater current flows through both legs, providing the heater with 240V. The motor could be 120 and if so, would flow through one leg.
If it were me, I'd replace that box with a breaker as suggested. I would not trust it, regardless of what else you find. And while I was at it, since the main fuse panel is apparently located in a similar environment and by all indications is likely even older, I'd get that replaced by a new breaker panel too.
What you say could be true. I know if I remove the fuse #1 the dryer stops, if I remove fuse #2 the dryer continues to run.
I agree I should replace the fuse box with a breaker box. I want to fix the problem with the dryer first (if found) and then I will replace the box reguardless. I don't want to replace the box first only to find the that dryer damages the breakers.
Cheers, Jim
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That simply indicates fuse #1 is the hot side for the motor. Either way the heating elements won't as they run on the 240V, from one hot to the other.
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The load even if faulty won't damage the breakers -- if it draws excess current (like a short) they'll simply open as intended; if it doesn't, they won't.
The current heating issue in the fuse box is a problem w/ the fuse box itself. If it were mine I'd remove it completely and see if it appeared to be able to be refurbished adequately or damaged/aged to the point of needing replacing rather than repairing. In place mounted on the wall still it's unlikely can inspect it closely enough to really tell or do any good particularly if the problem is as noted earlier from moisture corrosion or similar.
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dpb wrote:

The same can be said for fuses. If carrying their max load they will get hot. With a little more load they will get hot enough inside to melt metal. As I think someone said, fuses deterioration will not allow more than the rated current. The heating could be "normal".
The dryer nameplate should have a current rating. (Max load for fuses and circuit breakers is 80% = 24A for a continuous load - over 3 hours.)

Could also be a problem with resistance in a connection. If it adds a lot of heat to the fuses and the fuses are loaded near their rating they will blow "early".
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