furniture repair: why use webbing?

We have an 'older' couch, which is sagging badly. It has coil springs, which are supported on jute webbing that's nailed into the frame. The webbing is seriously failed.
We can replace the webbing, but I'm wondering, why not just screw a piece of 3/4" plywood to the frame instead? The advantages I've thought of for webbing are just to do with manufacturing, not functionality. I suspect there's more to it.
Thanks.
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On 3/31/2013 7:30 AM, George wrote:

I imagine webbing and springs distribute the weight. Plywood would not allow this. Sitting on plywood, if cushions are inadequate will probably be a pain in the butt ;)
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wrote:

Just to be sure my description was clear, the plywood would be _under_ the springs. So, from the top: cushion ... springs ... plywood.
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On 3/31/2013 9:24 AM, George wrote:

Then, I would think it should be OK although sofa may not seem as soft.
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On Sun, 31 Mar 2013 09:19:23 -0400, Frank

I think he means to keep the springs but get rid of the jute.
This would be a violation of the 1903 Manila Treaty with Indonesia, the Philipines, and Timor, which guaranteed the use of jute in American upholstered furniture, Section 9, Paragraph 7. www.state.gov/treaties/1903/Manila/9_7_tropical_products.asp
Even though you are not the original manufacturere, you're still bound by the terms.
If you want to risk ignoring the treaty and the possible fines, plywood will weigh more than the webbing. Other than that, nothing comes to mind. I faced the same problem with the reclinding desk chair I use at my work bench. It was old when I got it and now it's 35 years older, and the webbing has ripped. I had 5/;8" wide metal flats that O cemtered above (when the chair was upside down) each of the 3 rows of springs and screwed into the wooden frame.
Of the 3 flats, the back one has a screw on the right coming out but not out, The front one has a screw on the right out but still only a half inch below where it was, and The middle one has a screw on the left out, but the flat has only dropped two inches; I have to remember not to plop down on the chair with such force. I did this a year ago.
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wrote:

Thanks! And ignorance of law is no defense. (-:
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Not unless your happy to do 5 years in prison, supermax for tag cutters!
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wrote:

*AND* void your homeowner's insurance, right?
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yes, it says only to be removed by consumer :)
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We're sorry. That page can't be found and may have moved.
I've been in the furniture industry for 35 years and never heard of this before. Synthetics have replaced jute for many manufacturers because the fail rate is much much lower than jute. Even the twine used to tie the springs is synthetic now It's been used for years instead of jute, so I guess there should be lots of companies being fined
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George,
Webbing is light, cheap, and stretchy. Plywood is not. But it's just another home repair so use what you've got and live with the result.
Dave M.
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George wrote:

One reason is it provides a way to attach the springs. Coil springs need to be tied - generally, "eight way" - to each other and be attached to the base to keep them in place.
It is simple to re-web, all you need is the webbing and webbing pliers or a webbing stretcher.
--

dadiOH
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ed to

ase

or a

Yep I did a lot of rehupolster work for awhile. Took community college classes. It was fun learning and rewarding. I learned a LOT, by the last classes I was helping others:)
Springs on plywood BAD IDEA!
No give as cushioning, noise as the springs try to move around.
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I found a couple rush chairs on the sidewalk once. In Brooklyn, NY, and Queens, I only found one shop that sold rush, in Manhattan in the west 20's. The middle of the seats were missing. I made them match and then redid the middle. Straight-backed, ladder-back chairs. Incredibly uncomfortable. I sold them cheap or gave them away.
But it was fun. A big roll of rush was under 10 dollars in today's money.

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Google lattenroste images.
We have this on a bed and it is great, much better than springs or webbing.
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wrote:

I didnt' really notice 3/4". That is plenty thick and will be substantially heavy, especially since sofas are awkward to move. I guess I had in mind a chair, not a sofa, and 3/8", which probably won't break
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On 3/31/2013 7:30 AM, George wrote:

Softer landings when you sit down :o)
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Replace or just go over the existing webbing with synthetic or polypropylene webbing. Putting plywood will not let the springs work the way they need to and will eventually start squeaking. Jute was fine back in its day but poly/synthetic will not rot or stretch out like jute will.
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