Furnace questions

American Standard Freedom 80 single stage.
Just had the company out this morning to do maintenance on my furnace (cleaning and checking). I have a contract with this company.
The tech informed me the ignitor is ohming out high. Current at 26 should be between 17-20
Should this be replaced? Really don't want the furnace to be out in the middle of February.
If it should is it something a DIY can do. The contract company will do it, but charge $205.00 just for parts (that's with a discount). This part appears to be kinda like a glow plug. I could see it glow when he was showing me. Couldn't really tell where the part was actually located. Is it a plug and play part?
Your input would be appreciated.
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Poor connections on the typical service company supplied ohmmeter can give a high reading. If it glows bright and works right now, use the time to acquire a spare. The changeout isn't all that difficult as you will find in this NG archives. Repairclinic.com (maybe, haven't checked) and other online sources will have civilized prices. Good luck
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yup, I had an ignitor fail on my furnace shortly after purchasing current residence and I purchased a replacement (actually two; one to keep on the shelf) from Trible's locally for about $30 each IIRC. Once I located it (mine had fully failed, so I couldn't use the "follow the glow" method to locate it) it was about a 10 minute swap out. It'll cost a lot more to have someone else do it because of truck charges etc.
nate
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The above advice is good. I am a middle-of-the-road DIYer and have replaced the ignitor on my furnace a couple times. The part was available at a local HVAC supply place for about $35. Yes it was pretty much plug and play. Your part/mileage may vary. -- H
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Civilized.... I think I'd call it rape. Anyway thanks all, will take your advice and purchase myself. Will probably pull the skins off so I can see where the igniter actually is.
Thanks
btb
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Brent Bolin wrote:

The exact design depends on the furnace, but it will be right next to the gas nozzles. If you pull the cover off and start up the furnace, you'll see the igniter glow bright orange for a few seconds before the gas clicks on and the flame ignites. Normally held in by a single screw. While you're replacing it, take a few minutes to clean off the flame sensor if it uses the wire probe ionization type, those tend to soot up from time to time and result in shutdown.
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On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 12:03:29 -0800 (PST), Brent Bolin

I'd ditch any company that told me my ignitor was "ohming out high". i do this stuff for a living and have more cerificates/training than you can throw a stick at. while maintenance is always a good thing on your system, an ignitor ohming out high is pure B.S. Your service company is just using it's chance to do maintenance on your system to sell you something, period. I would bet you that their techs are paid on commision, they don't sell you something, they get nothing or a very small fee for the maintenance. I'd fire them and demand they refund my money because they are crooks. If you continue to do business with them you will find this out for sure.
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On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 19:10:42 -0800, Nate Certified Haeting and Cooling Professional wrote:

Your certificates and training dont impress me a bit. You need to learn before cracking your mouth. An igniter CAN be check for problems by ohming it out. Ive owned my own hvac business for 25 yrs now and worked for one of the high pressure hvac companies for 2 of those years. Ive seen it all but I havent seen everything. Everyday is a new day. Personally, I think selling a new igniter because it ohms out high is a little over the top but thats the way some do it. I dont. I also think the price the poster received from the company is a bit high but I think my prices are high too. They have to be. Keeping a business afloat these days is VERY EXPENSIVE. Think about it. Does a medical doctor come to your home with his operating room to remove your appendix? NO, yet hvac companies do everything including complete replacement in your home. I think thats pretty damn good and worth a lot. Could you imagine if your furnace broke, you called any/all hvac repair companies and they all said, "Sure, we will be happy to repair if for you. Just bring it in 3 weeks from now and we will happy to have a look?" Maybe you should take the stick you are throwing and hit yourself with it a few times. :-) Bubba
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1. That's why I posted this info to this group 2. I also have my own consulting service. And I'm not cheap. Cheaper for personal. Corporate, hang on for the ride 3. Thank God for this group
btb
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Your igniter is fine. The tech, knowing you are gullible because you bought a service contract (it, like an annual inspection, is not needed), is lying to get even more money out of you.
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I didn't even know you could use an Ohm meter to check current...? Learn something new everyday I guess.
Only way I know to check the ignitors is with an Amp meter.
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Limp Arbor wrote:

It's just a matter of wording. When was the last time you saw an ohm meter that didn't also have volts, amps, and other functions? Multimeter or VOM would have been a more correct term but whatever. For the current to be too high, the resistance in ohms of the igniter would have to be too low, assuming of course that the voltage driving it is correct. If it still lights the flame I would leave it alone, although picking up a spare to have on hand would be worthwhile.
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I suspect it's a typo. The OP meant to type "currently" More than one way to check an ignitor.
--
Christopher A. Young
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Like everyone says, this is a plug and play repair. Just make sure to pay attention to any heat shields you may remove to make sure you get them back facing the same direction. I've heard of a few cases where the shielding was installed wrong and the furnace kept burning out ignitors.
6 ohm difference is not enough to justify replacement. You can get that much difference between two brands of meters.
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A couple of points on replacing hot surface ignitors--I have heard that you should not touch the actual ignitor surface ( oil from your fingers can damage it), and have also heard that is not true. Regardless, it sure couldn't help one, so to be safe. just handle it by the block only. Also, after you get it in place, check VERY carefully, using a mirror if necessary, that the ignitor is not touching the burner or heat exchanger. Last yeaar I replaced one on a Trane ( same thing as American Standard), didn't notice that somehow it was touching one or the other, and when it came on it looked like an arc welder. Luckily I didn't fry the board along with the ignitor. About two years ago I went out on a 8-9 y/o Janitrol on a Sunday morning that another company had been to the night before. The same thing had happened to them. They actually charged the people a service call and left. They took the ignitor off and took it with them. I put a new one on and found it wasn't getting any power to it. Fried the board and I didn't have a new one. It was real cold and the people had a very young infant. They were real close to my house, so I went home and took the board out of my Janitrol furnace and gave it to them-- just charged a service call and the ignitor. I've gotten several boards since then from furnaces we have replaced and one of these days will get around to sticking one of them back into my furnace. I have dual fuel heat pumps and just stuck a relay on it for the blower. Probably change the filter when I do the board too. The old adage about the shoemaker's kids-- Larry
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On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 22:01:38 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Lp1331 1p1331) wrote:

There are at least 2 technologies used for hot surface ignitors - and the most common one is appently totally intollerant of abuse and more expensive than the other one. One is silicon carbide, the other silicon nitride. The silicon nitride is supposed to last 2 or 3 times as long as the carbide.
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On Dec 11, 8:32pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Ok I have pulled the skins off the furnace and trying to purchase a spare igniter.
American Standard Freedom 80 single stage M/N ADD060C924F0
The part number on the igniter looks to be B340971. I have not been able to find this number.
Found this link - http://www.hvacmechanic.com/forums/resservice/messages/18970.htm
Last post on the page says this -
I was able to find a dealer in town that had the part. The part# B340971 is outdated and has been replaced with part number IGN 00117. The parts look totally different. The new style has a bracket that mounts a much smaller ceramic housing. It's self explanitory once you attempt to install, (not so much when you go to pick up the part :-)
As mentioned above the igniter looks different. Has the same style probe, but the base is different(skinny). Also comes with a different mounting bracket. The current base on the existing igniter is a fairly large ceramic square. Electrical connection gender is correct.
Is this the correct replacement? If it is, any suggestions on where to purchase. Pricey part.
Thanks.
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