Furnace Power, from a Generator

Page 1 of 3  
The CT area is forecasted to have a blizzrd, with the possible loss of prime power.
My question: I have bought a gas powered generator, as a Back Up. I will, later, install a secondary breaker panel - for use under generator power. That seconadry panel would provide power to our key circuiots, including the furnace.
In the interim, is there a way I can power our nat gas furnace electronics, from our BU generator.
Hopefully we will not lose power???
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, January 26, 2015 at 10:03:57 AM UTC-6, Dave C wrote:

http://ricksdiy.com/general/wirefurnacetoagenerator/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, January 26, 2015 at 11:17:26 AM UTC-5, bob_villa wrote:

What Rick outlines there is not code compliant. We've been through this many times here. Code says that the only appliances that can be used on a cord and plug are ones that are designed to be used that way to allow servicing. Furnaces don't meet that test. There isn't an install manual for a furnace I've ever seen that says you can put it on a plug and cord of your choosing.
It's certainly not the worst thing I've ever seen and if he wants to do that for the storm, I don't see a problem with that. There are other people who have done it. Just that if he wants a long term solution, expects to pull a permit, which is probably required in CT, have it inspected, it may not pass. He could go ask the inspector. It's also likely to get flagged on a future home inspection for sale, etc. The correct way of doing it at the furnace is with a transfer switch and inlet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, January 26, 2015 at 10:28:46 AM UTC-6, trader_4 wrote:

Safe, fast, easy...it may not be code but I have heard (yes, anecdotal) it has passed inspections.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/26/2015 11:39 AM, bob_villa wrote:

Think neighbor did it the dumb way:
http://diy.stackexchange.com/questions/6118/can-i-backfeed-a-portable-generator-into-my-houses-electrical-system
He later got a transfer panel which is the way I did it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/26/2015 8:28 AM, trader_4 wrote:

That was my interpretation of the code. So, I went down to the permit office and asked the inspector. His response was that he'd never heard of such restriction and it would be no problem. I would feel better if he'd acknowledged the code statements before telling me it was no problem.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/26/2015 6:38 PM, mike wrote:

Inspector told me same thing.
His only recommendation was to use quality materials meaning don't buy the 19 cent plugs and receptacles at McHarbor Freight.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 01/26/2015 10:03 AM, Dave C wrote:

Sure, just disconnect the AC power wires and with a cord plug it into the generator output
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, January 26, 2015 at 11:03:57 AM UTC-5, Dave C wrote:

There are several ways. Ranging from code compliant to a suicide cord. Given that it's already snowing, the code compliant method window has likely closed. I've used the latter method for an emergency. But then I know what I'm doing.
After this event, instead of a secondary panel, I'd look into a lockout kit for your existing panel. Basically, you put an new breaker into the first slot of your panel, move whatever was there somewhere else. That breaker goes to an inlet. You can put the inlet outside, where the generator would be used or put it at the panel and use an extension cord. There is a lockout slide that prevents that breaker and the main breaker from being closed at the same time. Check for your panel to see if one is available from the manufacturer. If so, get it. If not, there is an aftermarket supplier:
http://www.interlockkit.com/
The manufacturer supplied one is 100% code compliant. The latter is likely acceptable, but some AHJs might have a beef.
Why anyone would put in another panel, move circuits over, etc, when using a manual type generator is beyond me. The above approach is low cost and allows you to run anything in the house, manage the load at the panel, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, January 26, 2015 at 11:03:57 AM UTC-5, Dave C wrote:

Before I had my generator wired into the breaker box (with a shut-out of co urse) I had the furnace on a plug system. I put an outlet into the circuit box above the furnace and put a plug on the cord coming up from the furnace . When the power went out, I switched from the house current plug to the ge nerator plug right next to it. Not up to code or high tech, but it kept us warm through several power outages.
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/26/2015 11:03 AM, Dave C wrote:

Yes, there is.
I agree, best wishes not losing power.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Per Dave C:

How big is the gennie and how much current does your house "Cruise" on? Peak demands?
If the gennie is small enough, consider a "Smart" transfer switch/secondary panel that can shut down circuit "A" temporarily while circuit "B" needs enough to otherwise overload the gennie.
Our house cruises on 800-1200 watts and runs comfortably on a 2KW generator with a smart switch in control - as long as we delegate making coffee, running the toaster and such to little propane stoves on the patio.
The smart switch kicks in when older refrigerators with very high starting surges need to start up. When that happens, lights go out in the rec room and the computer equipment runs on UPS backup for about five minutes.
We recently got a second 2KW generator that can run in parallel with the first - more for redundancy than the added capacity - but when both are online we can make toast, make coffee, and run the big microwave oven.
--
Pete Cresswell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/26/2015 11:03 AM, Dave C wrote:

I've done it with a hot-water boiler while I lived in Alaska. My little Honda 350W generator of the time was sufficient to run the circulator pump and the control stuff on the boiler. I just disconnected the power feed to the boiler, took an old extension cord and cut off the receptacle end and wired that to the wires to the boiler using wire nuts. Ran the extension cord outside the garage and plugged it into the generator and I was good to go. The house was pretty well insulated so I just ran the generator long enough to heat the house to 75-degrees and shut it down until it got down to 65-degrees and repeated the process until the power poles got put back up. I didn't even lose any of my tropical fish since I threw a heavy comforter over the aquarium to keep some of the heat in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 26 Jan 2015 15:05:33 -0500, Frank

Well, when I had my 2500 watt generator I added a receptacle to both the furnace and the freezer/refrigerator circuits and put the two circuits on one 220 volt pull-out (fuse panel). In case of a power failure I could pull the fuse block and plug the generator into one or the other with the suicide cord.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 01/26/2015 07:54 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Suicide cord? Really?
It's often easier to do it right. Installed a Siemens interlock and 40A breaker for less than $60.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is a way around it. Hardwire the furnace to a "disconnect device" - which is just a junction box with a cord mounted with a strain relief, which plugs into a SINGLE outlet, not a duplex - and you are code compliant. A twist lock lug is recommended. The single outlet is crucial to making it compliant as the furnace MUST be on a dedicated circuit.
Another way to do it is with a 3 way switch, hooking the furnace Live connection to the center terminal, and line to one of the switched terminals, and a line to the generator "port" on the other switched terminal, with the neutral and the ground "T"d (joined with wire nuts) in the box. (not neutral to ground, but furnace to panel to gen port for both neutral and ground)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, January 26, 2015 at 8:02:07 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

If by port you mean an inlet, then I agree, that is code compliant. Of course with less work you could install an interlock, breaker and the same inlet on the main panel and power not only the furnace, but anything else in the house too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd feel better if people in this thread would quote the actual code language they say allows or prohibits.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, January 26, 2015 at 8:57:38 PM UTC-5, Pico Rico wrote:

of

y

Here's a good discussion of the subject:
http://ecmweb.com/code-basics/flexible-cords-cables-and-fixture-wire
This is the most pertinent part:
*Appliances where the fastening means and mechanical connections are specif ically designed to permit ready removal for maintenance and repair, and the appliance is intended or identified for flexible cord connections [422.16] , but only when used with attachment plugs [400.7(B)].
It's hard to argue that a furnace is designed to be readily removable for maintenance. Even worse, it's clearly not intended or identified for use with a cord and plug.
But, as has been reported here and in the past, some AHJs are OK with it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Fr a 2500 watt generator? To operate only the furnace or the 'fridge?
Se my other (safer) solution - 3 way switsh
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.