furnace BTU

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On 12/25/2013 10:50 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'll give that my stamp of approval. Back in a lick.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Wed, 25 Dec 2013 07:04:37 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Maybe you could weight the van, and then weight the van with your dog inside, and take the difference.
Or if not, when a visitor comes over, he could hold the dog and stand on the scale.

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On Tue, 24 Dec 2013 17:53:55 -0600, The Daring Dufas

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On 12/23/2013 9:44 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Hey, watch your mouth. I detect a hint of sarcasm there. Twelve years of Catholic School made me the man I am today. You may already know I have never told a lie as a result. Honest.
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On Sun, 22 Dec 2013 16:29:36 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Is it licensed? Have you had it's head print taken?
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On Sat, 21 Dec 2013 23:01:40 -0600, The Daring Dufas

The house I first lived in had a coal furnace when my father bought it in 1945. (No he wasn't a returning vet. He had served in WWI.)
Soon after that, he put in a stoker, so my mother wouldn't have to shovel coal in the middle of the day. He would do it before leaving for work, and the stoker would add a little bit of coal all day long.
Soon after that, HE got tired of shovelling coal (at age 53) and he had put in a gas furnace It has a big fan, I'm sure, to circulate the air to a 2-story plus basement** house. And because I was a newborn in 1947, he had put in another fan in the duct that went to my room, so it was always warm. Born in January, didn't get a bath with water until April, so I wouldn't get chilled. Oil was used, baby oil or maybe olive oil!
**Unfinished basement. In fact water came up through the drain in the middle of the big room, whenever it rained much. So there was nothing in the big room. The washer and dryer had to be put on wood boxes, and the furnace rusted quite a bit at the floor.
There was still an iron coal chute door one could see from the outside, but I don't think there was any coal or even a coal chute anymore. Although there was a corner of the basement I never went to. Maybe it was full of coal, now that you mention it. Was it harder to get coal out of a basement than to suck heating oil out of a tank?
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On Saturday, December 21, 2013 2:02:50 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

That's like saying Ford can't spec the output horsepower of the engines on the cars they make, yet obviously they do. I just looked up the spec sheet for the Rheem gas furnace I have and they do spec both input and output. If you think about it, how could they spec that it's 93% efficient, that it meets govt standards etc, if they can't determine how much heat comes out, only how much goes in? All kinds of systems are spec'd for a variety of parameters, but of course if the system isn't installed properly, maintained properly, is old etc, then those spec;s aren't going to be met. That wasn't the issue. The issue was whether manufacturers spec furnaces on input or output. Clearly many in fact do both.
Just admit it, once again, you're wrong krw and Micky is right.
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On 12/19/2013 9:22 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Read the spec sheet carefully.
My furnace is rated on output.
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On Thursday, December 19, 2013 11:39:53 PM UTC-5, Irreverent Maximus wrote:

Just out of curiousity, you have the make and model?
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I have a 55 year old natural gas fired hot air furnace. Just a giant tin c an with a flame in the can and air blowing around it. When we first bought the house 45 years ago, I redid the insulation in walls and attic. I notic ed that the furnace was fired up only about 30% of the time even on subzero days. I took the orifice outof the gas nozzle, filled it in with solder, and then redrilled the nozzle so the cross-sectional area was 1/2 of what i t had previously been. The flame was greatly reduced, of course, and I had to rebalance the gas - air flow using the adjuster that was part of the no zzle assembly. The furnace now does run longer, but my gas consumption bas ed on degree days is much lower than it used to be.
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On 12/22/2013 12:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

and loss survey, and a proprerly sized modern 90% efficiency furnace. That one has to be a bit inefficient.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 12/22/2013 12:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Good that you dropped gas consumption, but I have to wonder what a modern furnace would do and what the payback would be. Ever had it checked out?
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On Monday, December 23, 2013 9:11:31 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

ught the house 45 years ago, I redid the insulation in walls and attic. I n oticed that the furnace was fired up only about 30% of the time even on sub zero days. I took the orifice outof the gas nozzle, filled it in with sold er, and then redrilled the nozzle so the cross-sectional area was 1/2 of wh at it had previously been. The flame was greatly reduced, of course, and I had to rebalance the gas - air flow using the adjuster that was part of th e nozzle assembly. The furnace now does run longer, but my gas consumption based on degree days is much lower than it used to be.

I know that when I replaced my 25 year old gas furnace with a 93% efficient one, my gas usage dropped over 40%. I'd be surprised that reducing the orrifice size would make much difference in efficiency.
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On 12/24/2013 5:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Reducing the orifice size just makes it run longer to even out temperature fluctuations. Still lots of heat going up the stack.
If you are in a cold climate, most anything over 30 years is wasting your money.
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not running cold as much of the time and more of the heat (percentage-wise) is being absorbed in the heat exchanger so less goes out the stack.
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On Thursday, December 19, 2013 1:17:00 AM UTC-6, Gz wrote:

I haven't pursued getting a "modern" furnace because I have neighbors who h ave put in newer furnaces and have had all sorts of problems with them. As an electrical engineer, I love to try new technology, but I have to say tha t I will keep this furnace for as long as it holds out since there is nothi ng electronic to go wrong when there is are nearby lightning strikes or pow er surges, both of which have taken out neighbors furnaces more than once.
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On Wed, 25 Dec 2013 08:48:45 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net"

I'd have though that an electrical engineer would have the solution for that.
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He did and he said what it was. Keep the old one going as long as possible. The new electronic controllers violate the KISS principle of reliability. Mark
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On Wednesday, December 25, 2013 2:49:41 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

As an electrical engineer, I love to try new technology, but I have to say that I will keep this furnace for as long as it holds out since there is no thing electronic to go wrong when there is are nearby lightning strikes or power surges, both of which have taken out neighbors furnaces more than onc e.

It is a vailid point to consider. How many more problems they have, IDK, but anytime you have electronics as opposed to just motors and switches, there is more potential for that kind of problem. I've had a high efficiency furnace for 3 years now. And I know several other people who have had them for years. IDK of any problems with the electronics on any of them, at least so far. Sone of those houses have surge protection, others don't.
It also depends where you live, how prevalent lightning is, whether you have the house protected from surges, etc. With an ancient furnace like that, a new high efficiency unit could cut his gas bill by 40% or more. But even then, if you do the payback calculation, even if he lives in most areas of the USA, the payback period could be a long time. If he lives where the furnace isn't used that much, it could be 20+ years. I did mine when they had the $1500 fed tax credit, various state rebates, etc. that reduced the cost significantly. Plus, at 25 years old, I figured it was near it's EOL and better to replace it while I had a good deal.
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On Wed, 25 Dec 2013 08:48:45 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net"

Wow. That's very interesting. I don't want to lose a control board to lightning or surges. They're at least 500 dollars by now, probalby 7 or 800.
My 34 year old oil furnace does have a few electronic parts, that is, one circuit board with maybe 30 parts iirc (last looked at 10 years ago at least) including 1 or 2 transistors iirc, or even maybe a little IC.
I had trouble with the mechanical relay on it for a while, but for some reason that stopped giving me trouble 20 years ago and has worked fine ever since.
And a month after I bought the house, when it was 4 years old, when I had 4 friends visiting from NYC on July 4 weekend. the AC failed becaue the 110 volt tranformer that powered the circuit board broke. The guy at the supply house wanted to sell me a new circuit board for 350 or 400 dollars, but I whined and he sold me a transformer instead for 10 dollars. Still working 30 years later. Transformer is too big to go where the old one did, as part of the circuit board, but that's not a problem
(Moved in middle of May The AC broke at noon on Saturday, July 4. The water went out at 6PM on Saturday, and all the electricity failed at noon on Sunday! Hard to believe. I've never lost more than one of these in any 3 month period since.
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