Furnace

I am needing a new furnace. I am looking at a regular gas furnace or hybrid furnace (25 y/o house and I can't put in a high efficiency furnace without major construction due to the placement of the furnace room in the basement). Any suggestions or things to think about, look for?
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On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 7:41:15 AM UTC-5, Kurt Ullman wrote:

I had a Ruud that was the original in the house, lasted for 28 years without any problems, at least for the last 18 that I owned it. It was still working, just replaced it in 2010 to take advantage of the tax credit available. I replaced it with a Rheem, high efficiency, which is made by the same company. I'm very happy with it too. When I looked around back then, from Consumer Reports and such, there didn't appear to be any significant difference in complaints, problems, etc between Rheem and what are perceived as probably better brands by the consumer, eg Trane, etc.
Just curious what the problem is with being able to go with a high efficiency? I'm guessing it's venting? If you're located somewhere warm, probably won't such a big diff, but if you're somewhere northern, a high eff would save considerable money over the years, so I'd make sure I considered every option for getting one in there. Also, I recall that per EPA edict, only high efficiency can be installed in the colder states now, so hope that ain't you :)
As for hybrid, not sure what the point would be. Nat gas is usually the cheapest anyway, unless you went with something like geothermal and have low electric rates, etc. Geo costs a fortune to install. And I don't recall seeing a hybrid anything that wasn't high efficiency, so you might be out of luck there
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On 11/5/2013 6:57 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The Dept. of Energy cancelled its planned rule change after being sued by a natural gas lobbying group. They're going to go through the whole rulemaking process all over again to humor the lobbyists. In the meantime, the US is still operating under the existing rule, which dates back nearly twenty years. So nobody is required to install high efficiency furnaces.
The gang back on alt.hvac in the old days consistently opined that the brand of furnace didn't make much difference. What was important was having it correctly sized and installed by a qualified hvac company. Their point being, a hack install of a top-brand furnace wouldn't perform any better than a cheap brand, and a correctly installed cheap brand would perform as well as a top notch brand.
Per their advice, OP, screen your hvac contractors by their willingness and ability to run a manual J to properly size your furnace to your home. If they can't or won't do that, that's your first indication that they're hacks.
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On 11/5/2013 7:41 AM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

As usual. Ask your friends who they recommend. Get three or four quotes. Go with the one who is NOT high pressure, and who makes sense when he speaks.
As to brands, I don't think there is a lot of difference. Trane uses proprietary parts that can be expensive. Goodman (formerly Janitrol) is basic, and reasonably dependable.
What's the deal with placement? Do you have drywall ceilings in your cellar?
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On 11/05/2013 06:41 AM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

I'd seriously consider a high efficiency type. If the contractor cannot handle your specifics then it's time for one who can. The venting is not rocket science.
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On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 11:14:03 AM UTC-5, philo  wrote:


It's not rocket science but there are rules as to mximum length of vent pipe runs, each 90 elbow reduces that length, rules as to how far from corners, doors, windows, other vents, etc they can be. And you don't have a choice to move the furnace, unless you want to redo a lot of duct work for a lot of $$$. There are some cases where it just may not be worth the cost and trouble.
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On 11/05/2013 03:07 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Well, then I guess the OP could do what I did and put in one with a two stage fan.
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On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 7:14:24 PM UTC-5, philo  wrote:

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I've seen two stage furnaces, but never a furnace with just a two stage fan. Even a two stage furnace makes only a small difference, if any in efficiency. They are more a factor of comfort, allegedly giving the furnace more run time on moderate days to help even out temps in the house. But I've had a single stage in several houses for many years, the systems were properly balanced, and I never had an issue with uneven heating. But I think it may be a moot point, because two stage may only be made in high efficiency models.
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On 11/06/2013 06:59 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote: Xventing is not rocket science.

Mine is a two stage and a medium efficiency furnace
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On Wednesday, November 6, 2013 2:15:18 PM UTC-5, philo  wrote:

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Two stage what? You initially said he should consider a furnace with a two stage *fan*, whatever that is. Do you mean you have a two stage furnace? A two stage furnace fires at two different outputs. Also, medium efficiency doens't mean much. 80% 95% does.
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On 11/06/2013 03:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Yes, the blower is two speeds not the furnace itself.
It's close to 20 years old now....probably 80% efficiency.
What did me the most good immediately was to insulate the attic.
Finally got around to having the windows replaced this year...the house is 115 years old.
Coal furnace and gas lighting originally. The only other luxury was running water. City records show it was electrified in 1932. The conduit is almost like water pipe.
When I moved in here in 1979, the second thing I did was to disconnect the gas pipes that were still going to ceiling lights, though they were capped off.
The /first/ thing I did however, was to take the light switch out from inside the shower stall!!!!!!
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