FS Six 20A outlet shop electrical panel, each outlet protected

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In summaryl, no splice shall rely on solder for mechanical and electrical connections per 2002 NEC 110.14(b)
IMHO: this means you can use solder to dress up the splice, or tin the tips of stranded wire for easier wirenutting.
As for grounding: I remember re-itterates no fusable metals, but don't remember where. But 110.14(b) basicly says no.
hth,
tom @ www.WorkAtHomePlans.com
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wrote:

OK-my 1999 copy says there must be a mechanically and electrically secure joint before soldering...
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wrote:

And IMHO, your first example is a "soldered connection". Does the 2002 code actually prohibit the use of solder on any connection, or just as the sole means for mechanical and electrical connection?
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No offence to you, but please look at your breaker panel. Does the main breaker current rating equal the sum of all the individual breakers?
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Ofcouse not, breakers are rated for the conductor sizes, and the disconnect is rated for the service enterance conductors and panel.
imho,
tom @ www.ChopURL.com
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wrote:

Exactly the point I was trying to make...
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And how many 15A receptacles do you have on one breaker?
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Wrong: cord-and-plug connected devices do not fall under the purview of the NEC, which applies only to premises wiring.

Wrong again. The NEC prohibits connections from relying on solder *only*, but, again, the NEC does not apply to cord-and-plug connected devices. And there's no reason not to use solder with AC.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Wow, who knew this would generate so many posts!
I goofed in that 120A supply would not be needed. In fact 20A branch circuit protection in the panel would be adequate. Of course, then it would defeat the purpose of the device, because the branch circuit breaker would be tripping continually. In order to have adequate power for multiple shop tools, you would need to increase the amperage supplied to the device. The 30A 220V feeder would be a practical solution, however as was pointed out in a previous post, this would be non-code-compliant because you would be 'over-fusing' the individual receptacle wiring in the device.
I still have a problem with the solder-only, non-insulated connections. If something goes awry and the device's overcurrent protection device overheats, the solder will melt. You could end up with a hot wire make contact with a metal box...
I'm assuming this device was part of a UL approved UPS. That's fine so long as it is in the original unit. Once the device is removed, it is not UL approved for the new application. The problem is that a DIY (again, no offence intended--I am one too) may use an inappropriate device box or mount the device unsafely, or over-fuse the device.
And as far as legal liability, I'm not a lawyer, but if someone's house burnt down as a result of this device, I'm sure a lawyer would get lots of mileage out of OP if they had a way to find him/her.
I'm sure the device is worth the asking price of 25$ just for the component parts, but if anyone does purchase this device, it should be used for just that--parts.
Mr Fixit eh
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