Frugal lighting

Page 3 of 3  
Bob Adkins wrote:

Do you live in a rural area? Is it possible that your power has severe fluctuations? Frequent lightning strikes? Unfortunately, rural power isn't as clean as urban (as a crude generalization). That could contribute to your short bulb life.
I use Phillips and 'Globe Energy Savers' (a brand in a big box hardware store) and get years out of them. I'd say 4-5 years is typical for me and some last longer.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Any CFL brand that is Energy Star listed has to have lamp life tested and the data supplied to Energy Star periodically to keep the listing. Energy Star requires testing of other performance data too. See: http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/product_specs/program_reqs/cfls_prog_req.pdf
TKM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(edited for space)

I would like to add: Watch out for overheating CFs by putting them in small enclosed fixtures and in downlights. Many CFs don't take this well, and there is a general trend that this is worse with higher wattages.
Some actually rated to take the heat of recessed ceiling fixtures are Philips SLS non-dimmables up to 23 watts.
I consider it notable that when I see recessed ceiling fixtures in commercial buildings with CFs, the bulbs usually do not have built-in ballasts and will not screw into "regular sockets". The ballast is somewhere else in the fixture where it will not get as hot.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why can't they use components that compensate for the heat?
Don
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Perhaps you mean *tolerate* the heat or *disipate* the heat.
The former could mean more exotic materials. Silicon Carbide semiconductors are being developed which operate over a wider temperature range. They will, of course, be more expensive than old-school parts.
The latter requires more surface area so that the heat will be more readily radiated to ambient. This means that the volume of the product must increase to accomodate a larger heatsink and/or venilation must be increased.
In a strongly competetive market, these options don't look especially attractive to most manufacturers. As the word spreads about the problems that these products have and if a repository of comparative data is established, perhaps things will change for the better. I won't be holding my breath.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It wouldn't matter how well the (CF) unit "dissipates" the heat if it's in an enclosed fixture. ( you'd have to look into how well the fixture dissipates the heat )
On the bright side, lets say a fixture is rated for "60 watt max" bulb, then a 60W CFL which only creates 18(?) watts of heat should have a pretty comfortable factor. ????
As for hi-temp components.... most commercial grade electronic components should be good up to "boiling" ( 212f ) except of capacitors.... ( I don't know about modern caps )
<rj>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com wrote:

Turns out, a 42 watt CFL heats a fixture about as much as, or even a bit more than, a 60 watt incandescent. A CFL produces little infrared.
Of course, how much a lamp heats up the house is determined by wattage alone.
A downlight fixture at its temperature limit will almost certainly bake a CFL to death pretty quickly.

Most semiconductors are rated good to a junction temperature of 150 C, or 302 F. Oc course, the surface of the semiconductor has to be cooler than that in order for heat to flow out. And the air around the semiconductor has to be even cooler, the inside surface of the ballast housing has to be even cooler, and the outside surface of the ballast housing has to be cooler still.
Decent electrolytic capacitors are rated for 105 degrees C but usually only a few thousand hours life expectancy at that temperature. CFL manufacturers have put a lot of work into finding capacitors that hold up well enough to not do too much damage to their reputations.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Sorry to hear yours don't work out so well.
I buy the 'whatever' brand at Wal---- and they last several years for me. The ones in the kitchen are the shortest lived because the fixture has an enclosed 'globe' that seems to hold the heat in and shorten their life. But even at that I get 18 months to 2 years from them.
daestrom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

19 (if I counted right) 12W CFs here for over 7 years. One failure so far at about 6 years.

Wayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.