FRS walkie talkies

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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I mentioned that to our counties Emergency services people (both the head and his deputy) and was told. "There is nothing we can do to change it" When I mentioned lawsuits and such from deaths and fires where the radio signals didn't trip our pagers or where crews couldn't talk to each other the answer was "We are not responsible for that, and we're not worried because nobody will sue us. We're just following the law"
I figure it will take a death or two in families that are involved in DC before they will start listening to the folks who use the equipment over big M and their ilk.
--
Steve W.

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"Steve W." wrote:

They sound like the German guards at the death camps. :(

I never trust any ilk.
The volunteer fire department where I lived in Ohio had no dispatcher. The phone rang at a paper mill a half mile away. They would trip the old Plectrons over a leased phone line, then turn on a W.W. II surplus air raid siren, in case the old radios weren't working. It also alerted anyone with hearing that the volunteers would be rushing to the fire house, then to the fire. That paper mill is no more, and the county took over dispatch before I left Ohio. That was before 911, and the call had to be routed to another town which was less than perfect.
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Sounds like a good plan.
In our VFD, the phone was answered by a fireman who launched the page and drove the firetruck to the scene. People receiving the page went either to the fire or to the station to roll more equipment.
There's probably no limit to the procedures that have been found to work well in various communities.
By the way, about 80% of the firefighters in the US are volunteers.
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HeyBub wrote:

I've worked with several volunteers. One had to respond to a fire where we worked, on Friday night. The Northern Electric 'Merlin' phone system caught fire, and did a lot of damage to the front offices & engineering department.
A neighbor's house burnt, and they couldn't get the tanker down the sand road because of the weight, so they ran a half mile of hose between the smaller pumper & the highway where the larger trucks were waiting. They were there for about three hours before it was out. I heard the chief tell them to Roll & carry the hose back to the highway, so I got my truck, and slowly backed out to the highway as they rolled & tossed the hose on the truck. They thanked me, but I was glad to help. I would be useless, these days, but you help where you can. :)
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Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I thank you for that assist on behalf of my fellow Fire Fighters. You would be surprised how small things like that help. We had an auxiliary until a few years ago. They were mainly wives and folks who wanted to help but didn't want or couldn't be full responders. They would hold fund raisers and show up at calls with coffee, food and such. At 3AM when you've been dragging hose and doing interior work a cup and a cruller are VERY welcome items. Sadly they disbanded due to lack of interest by the current generation in helping the community.
Our dispatch comes through the county and with the current radio system there are many times you ask for second tones or repeats due to garbled static. This will get worse soon with the new radios going to narrow band and less than 50 watts of power.
--
Steve W.

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I collected quite a few frs units, one set of midland gmrs/frs. I icom frs. Two base stations. One radio shack, one off brand. One radio shack mobile unit magnetic ground plane remote antenna. Several cheap frs units, some broke. When I first started using them, most people did not use cell phones, at least the younger persons could not afford them. They still can't afford them.
One base unit has all the bells and whistles. My radio shack is built well but simple, toggle switch to set channel, act as frs intercom.
I measured my midlands, gmrs having at least 2 watts.
Greg
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The farthest I transmitted was at least 8 miles on hilltops using my best frs, icom and radio hack mobile unit. Easy to talk to planes. The longest frs contact reported in nuts and volts, was something like 130 miles or more on some kind of atmospheric deal.
I know at one time on lake Erie I connected through a Canadian cell site using AT&T system, 50 miles away. Never got billed, back in mid 90's. I think I may have got billed another time, that's how I found where I connected through. The reception was real weak on near shore stations, but 10 miles into the water, reception was great with stronger towers visible. Why am I talking about cell phones.
Greg
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Back when there was Frontier Tel, and Genesee Tel, in the Rochester NY area. I had a mobile cell phone in the van. I was near edge of Lake Ontario, and the pager went off. I called the answering people, on roam. And then the customer. Turns out my cell was working towers in Toronto, Canada, and it was costing me two bucks a minute for roam.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I know at one time on lake Erie I connected through a Canadian cell site using AT&T system, 50 miles away. Never got billed, back in mid 90's. I think I may have got billed another time, that's how I found where I connected through. The reception was real weak on near shore stations, but 10 miles into the water, reception was great with stronger towers visible. Why am I talking about cell phones.
Greg
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Are those the ones with four AAA cells?
The one time I was doing wire pulling and other work at a volunteer job, set of AAA made it through one shift, and only part way through the next day. Of course, I was on third floor of VERY tall floors, and my batteries were in the van. Now, I always carry the second set with me.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

I also have some Cobras. They run for nearly a week on 'listen', and with intermittant talking (say 10 minutes a day) keep up on regular alkalines for about three days.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

If you run FRS channels they will last longer. Licensed high power GMRS channels use more power, and of course requires license.
Greg
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On Mon, 6 Aug 2012 09:05:33 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

that often. If you are using them every day, get rechargeable batteries. Best is a unit with a base station and a built in charger. My walkie talkies have the contacts for it but I didn't buy the charger base.
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On Mon, 6 Aug 2012 09:05:33 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

The AA cells have much higher capacity than the AAA cells. See the Duracell spec sheets here: http://www.duracell.com/en-US/Global-Technical-Content-Library/Product-Data-Sheets.jspx?icn=Prim/PrimNav/Product-Data-Sheets&cc=Primary
You'll also get much longer battery life from a radio that uses a physical click-on/off switch than one that uses a touch-on/off switch. The touch switch typically draws a small but continuous crrent from the batteries
I like the Uniden EcoTrek FRS420 and FRS440 radios that have a click-on/off switch on the volume control, use three AA cells, and have a clip that hangs well from a belt loop. After a number of years, on of the FRS420's has a problem with low audio output, but I've had them so long I no longer remember when I bought them.
Along the way, I've used Cobra and Midland FRS radios that were smalller and lighter, but used AAA cells so required more frequent battery changes. One of them came with rechargeable batteries, but only their rechargeable batteries could be used with the stad charger - their batteries were large enough to trip the internal charging switch, but normal size rechargeables didn't because they are the same size as standard batteries.
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I've noticed that the nicad packs tend to have contacts on the side of the pack, for the drop in charger. Loose nicads or NiMH work, but need a separate charger.
Yes, AA have two or three times the capacity as AAA cells.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
The AA cells have much higher capacity than the AAA cells. See the Duracell spec sheets here: http://www.duracell.com/en-US/Global-Technical-Content-Library/Product-Data-Sheets.jspx?icn=Prim/PrimNav/Product-Data-Sheets&cc=Primary
You'll also get much longer battery life from a radio that uses a physical click-on/off switch than one that uses a touch-on/off switch. The touch switch typically draws a small but continuous crrent from the batteries
I like the Uniden EcoTrek FRS420 and FRS440 radios that have a click-on/off switch on the volume control, use three AA cells, and have a clip that hangs well from a belt loop. After a number of years, on of the FRS420's has a problem with low audio output, but I've had them so long I no longer remember when I bought them.
Along the way, I've used Cobra and Midland FRS radios that were smalller and lighter, but used AAA cells so required more frequent battery changes. One of them came with rechargeable batteries, but only their rechargeable batteries could be used with the stad charger - their batteries were large enough to trip the internal charging switch, but normal size rechargeables didn't because they are the same size as standard batteries.
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Keep in mind that NiCd and NiMH cells have a lower voltage than alkaline cells even when they are fully charged, so you start out at a disadvantage. They will likely need to be recharged far more often than alkalines would need to be replaced -- and there is a limit to the number of times they can be recharged.
Perce
On 08/08/12 03:55 am, Stormin Mormon wrote:

http://www.duracell.com/en-US/Global-Technical-Content-Library/Product-Data-Sheets.jspx?icn=Prim/PrimNav/Product-Data-Sheets&cc=Primary
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Oddly enough, NiMH last longer than alkalines in digital cameras. Charging flash is a high demand application. Transmitting on FRS is also a high current draw. I'm not sure, but NiMH might last longer in walkie talkies.
In any case, a night in the charge stand is cheaper than a set of replacement alkalines.
Rechargables self discharge, so a walkie kept in the back pack for occasional camping trips needs alkalines, cause NiMH would be dead by then.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Keep in mind that NiCd and NiMH cells have a lower voltage than alkaline cells even when they are fully charged, so you start out at a disadvantage. They will likely need to be recharged far more often than alkalines would need to be replaced -- and there is a limit to the number of times they can be recharged.
Perce
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I used to use RCA tac 100s for jobsite work. they were made near me in medowlands pa.....
not as durable as older models but lighter.....
the RCAs were commercial receivers, took them once with some friends to the henry ford museum and greenfield village. this before cell phones......
people gave us wierd looks and a couple asked if we were security.....
now the odd person not carrying a cell phone is a rarity.........
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"Are you security?" "I'm not at liberty to say".
Ah, well. I bet they worked, and did a good job?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I used to use RCA tac 100s for jobsite work. they were made near me in medowlands pa.....
not as durable as older models but lighter.....
the RCAs were commercial receivers, took them once with some friends to the henry ford museum and greenfield village. this before cell phones......
people gave us wierd looks and a couple asked if we were security.....
now the odd person not carrying a cell phone is a rarity.........
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I recharge the 2500 mAH NiMH AAs for my camera every 1st of the month, and they need a couple of hours to complete.
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The new "precharged", "stay charged" or "eneloop" ones are supposed to be good. I bought some Raoyvac precharged at Walmart, and have been pleased with them.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I recharge the 2500 mAH NiMH AAs for my camera every 1st of the month, and they need a couple of hours to complete.
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