Frozen well pump - help!

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I think I'm going to give up and wait this out. Everyone THINK SPRING for me.
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You won't have to wait for spring. We'll have above-freezing temperatures again soon. My guess is by Valentine's Day. What we're experiencing right now is unusual for central Indiana: "normal" February weather is lows in the low 20s and highs in the upper 30s. Normal weather for today's date is low 20, high 37.
http://www.crh.noaa.gov/ind/print_localdata.php?loc=txtdat&data=climatenormals . txt
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in wrote:

God, I hope so. Gunga Din, I'm not.
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I don't own one and I don't know anyone who does. Nor can I find one for rent and I'm not buying one just for this. Plus, it wasn't a canvas tarp, it was a plastic one. It would have been a blue plastic puddle real quick. :)
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Hey, Warrior, greetings from a fellow Hoosier! What part, exactly, of central Indiana are you in? I'm in Indianapolis right now... used to be in rural Pendleton until mid-'99.

It's a PITA, all right. I certainly sympathize.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in wrote:

I'm near Greencastle. Originally I'm from NY, tho. How do you like them Colts, eh? I saw The Bills go to the Superbowl four times and lose but got a Superbowl team in IN. :)
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Been a Colts fan since they moved here. We've waited a *long* time for this, and I'm loving every minute of it.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Mon, 05 Feb 2007 03:28:58 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I'm glad you got parole.
I spent JHS and HS in Indianapolis.
WAs there two years ago for my uncle's funeral. The city is bigger but nothing else has changed.
It might have been on this group I mentioned how they motor boat in one of the city's two reservoirs, and people didn't believe me. (They only have sail boats in the other.)

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my
house
work,
try some electric blankets laid on the ground and over the spigot cover the blankets on the ground w/ hay then cover the hay w/ a couple horse blankets or tarps but NOT plastic.
mike........
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Mike,
I also like the electric blanket idea but recommend those small, waterproof, heating pads instead. I'd be nervous about water leaks so the pads should be waterproof and the switches and plugs need to be protected from water as well/
Dave M.
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i said this hoping it would be used w/ the tent the OP was referring to setting up. as far as i know new electric blankets are water resistant and i'm assuming that the OP would shut the power off so there shouldn't be any puddling or pouring of water. using a power cord w/ outlets that trips off would be good too.
mike.......
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Save the earth. It\'s the only planet with chocolate and Starbucks!!
BetsyB
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It's called a freeze-proof hydrant. If this one's been damaged, that's what you ask for when you go to replace it.
*That* is a lot of work, though. The water line will be 3 or 4 feet below ground, and so obviously it takes a *lot* of digging to get down there.
Your best bet, actually, is to leave it alone until the weather warms up. Unless you can build a shed around it, you're going to have a really tough time getting it warm enough to thaw. Any damage that may be done by freezing has already happened, and will not worsen by leaving it alone. Carry water for the horses from the house with buckets.
Yes, it's a pain, but I've done it before, and you can too.
Our previous home was a mini-farm. We, too, had an outside well, and multiple hydrants in the pasture and barn. We never had a hydrant freeze -- just the main pipe from the pressure tank to the hydrants, that's all. The previous owners hadn't taken very good care of things: the wellhead and pressure tank were in a small shed that had no insulation, multiple holes in the siding, and no heat source save a single 100W light bulb. We moved in in February, and the dang thing was frozen solid. So we spent about a month schlepping water from the house in 5-gallon buckets for the horses.
It's not fun. But it's doable.
As soon as the weather warmed up, I repaired the freeze damage, then tore the shed down and built a new one -- with insulation, and a 400W electric heater.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Sun, 04 Feb 2007 14:55:14 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Actually, the "Shed" could be a steel 55 gallon drum with both ends removed. Place the drum over the hydrant and put an electric space heater inside. Cover the top with metal. That'll thaw it. If the drum is not high enough, oyt it on concrete blocks but be sure the entire bottom is closed.
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Wouldn't it be simpler to use a 55-gallon drum with only one end removed??
You're assuming, too, that a 55-gallon drum is long enough to cover the hydrant. For most of the hydrants I've seen, that's not a correct assumption.

What you're forgetting is that by this time, the hydrant is surely frozen at least a foot below the surface, too -- so the OP needs to thaw not only the frozen hydrant, but frozen ground too.
I still think the best way to thaw it is to wait for warm weather -- although on a sunny day, a 55-gallon drum, painted black, with one end closed, might do the trick.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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anybody mention turning off the power?
wrote:

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It was off when it froze.
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On Sun, 4 Feb 2007 17:19:40 +0000 (UTC), FragileWarrior

If you missed the original message, she shut off the pump and left the water standing in the hydrant. Hydrants must be shut off to let the water standing in the pipe to drain into the soil at the bottom of the hydrant. Thats the way they work. It should have been shut off before the pump was shut off.
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It wouldn't matter if the hydrant was shut off after the pump -- the only thing that matters is if the hydrant is shut off at all.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Mon, 05 Feb 2007 03:36:35 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

If the hydrant is in the ON position, the entire stand-pipe is filled with water. It can not drain down into the soil when the handle is in the UP (or ON) position. They operate like a 2-way valve. When the handle is UP, the water comes out the hose fitting. When the handle is DOWN, it shuts off the water that enters the hydrant (below the ground), and opens a drain hole to allow the water to drain out of the stand-pipe. If she left the handle UP, the pump was off so no water could flow, but the drain hole was never opened to allow the water to drain out of the stand-pipe. That water froze.
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