Frost Proof Sillcock Froze and Split

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On Fri, 15 Nov 2013 14:33:24 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Nonsense. A frost free silcock is just one variation of a silcock. It is still a silcock (a stopcock that mounts through the sil of a house).
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My back yard spigot goes through the block wall, not the sill. Where do I buy a frost free wallcock?
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On 11/15/2013 11:26 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Wall Mart?
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On Sat, 16 Nov 2013 04:26:54 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

Find a hole in a tree. Check for bees first.
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On Wed, 13 Nov 2013 21:14:18 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

It is a big enough tube that thw wader"slumps" enough to let air in - and the water runs out. The more likely cause of the frostproof splitting is the owner left a hose attached. That will do it, just about every time. In my case it didn't split, - it just pulled the tube out of the faucet/valve portion - so the tap opened and water ran through the hose the first time it got warm, and filled my window well with water - which ran in the window and (most of it) into the laundry tub.
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My son, when he was like 10, opened the backyard spigot and nothing came out because it was frozen. Not being fully versed in righty tighty, lefty loosey, he got confused (he admitted as much later) and wasn't sure if he had turned it off or left it on.
A few days later the weather warmed up, the spigot unfroze and came on full blast. At the time I had a grading problem and massive amounts of rain (or a fully open spigot) would cause water to come under the back door and into the basement. Luckily, my wife had taken the day off of work and eventually heard the rushing water and shut off the main before too much water entered the basement. Had we both been at work, the water would have run for 8+ hours.
(I have since buried a 55 gallon plastic drum as a drywell right outside the basement door and have not had a water issue even in the worst downpours, the kinds that used cause the basement to flood.)
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On Wednesday, November 13, 2013 7:15:10 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I didn't see the show, but I tend to agree. It would have to be installed with a good bit of backward tilt for it not to drain enough to prevent it from freezing and bursting the pipe. Never seen that. But like you say, I have seen them freeze from leaving a hose full of water attached. You don't even need to remove the hose, just take the nozzle off and make sure the rest of the hose is a couple feet lower than the sillcock. It's when you leave it connected, full of water, with no place for the water to drain that it then freezes.
In my case it didn't split, - it just pulled the

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I'm not saying that your drain is a bad idea, quite the contrary.
However, I've never seen one suggested on any Sillcock installation site. I just watch 3 youtube's and scanned through the top three text hits on installing a frost free Sillcock. Not a single one mentions a drain.
If I recall correctly, 4 or 5 of the 6 suggested the downward slant, but not one mentions an interior drain.
Is that something you've seen/learned or was it your own idea?
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Now I'm confused.
Yes, the show talked about the pitch, although it wasn't a brief mention of the pitch. The entire segment (a full minute?) related to Sillcock was about the fact that the old had split because of the pitch to the interior. He explained in detail why the pitch should be towards the outside.
However, you mentioned that when you saw it, you thought to yourself "Why no drain?" My question is what made you think that? I've never seen a drain on a spigot nor have I seen any installation instructions that suggested one. So, I ask again, not in a challenging manner, simply out of curiosity: Is the drain something that you came up with on your own or have you seen them installed?
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Thanks, but I don't need a picture - a drain is a drain - I just need a direct answer to my question.
It's not a hard question. Where do you get the idea to add an internal drain to a sillcock?
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On Wednesday, November 13, 2013 10:30:36 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

IDK what he's they're talking about either. Drain? What drain? Freeze-proof sillcocks don't have a drain. They just have the valve 18"+ or so back with a long valve stem so the water gets shut off inside the house where it doesn't freeze. The valve is installed horizontal or very slightly pitched downward. When you turn it off, the remaining water runs out of the pipe like any other water would out of a sillcock. That's why if you leave a hose on it that's full of water it will freeze and bust. Or if you're dumb enough to put it in with it tilted back into the house, it can stay full of water.
If you did put a "drain" in it, IDK how that would work or where the water would go. The whole purpose of these things was so that you didn't have to shut them off and drain them in the winter and so you could have water available all year long.
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On Wednesday, November 13, 2013 4:14:18 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

No vacuum.
You're thinking of that straw trick where you dip the straw in the soda, put your finger over the end, and the soda doesn't run out.
That only works if the tube is VERTICAL.
Try it horizontal some time. The liquid runs right out.
The air would come in through the end of the sillcock.
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wierd report. I am 56 have lived in pittsburgh my entire life do nothing to outdoor valves and have never had one freeze or split or whatever. normally theres a hose always attached. during these years we have had sub zero temperatures
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wrote:

Depends on plumbing setup I suspect. If enough heat gets conducted through the pipe from the run inside a heated space, it won't freeze. I'm a bit north of Chicago and always shut my inside valves and open the outside to drain the pipe runs when temps get close to freezing. Might not be necessary, since the inside piping is in a heated basement. There's also some water flow turbulence at the inside hose bib run Tee. All the house water supply flows past that. But it's been standard practice for me since I can remember. Two reasons I guess. Why take a chance, and it's part of the fall and spring rituals. Goes along with putting away the lawn stuff and getting the snow shovels from the garage rafters in the fall, and the opposite in the spring.
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wrote:

Your house is probably old enough that it's leaking enough heat to keep the silcocks from freezing.
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