Front stoop support columns are soaked !!

Hello I'm painting my front steps and the stoop. The paint has been flaking off t he bottom of the support columns, when I peeled it off the wood underneath is waterlogged. This isn't the result of one particular storm, I remember l ast time I painted, year or two ago, they were wet then too. The columns ap pear to be at least partially hollow, so my first though was to drill a hol e from underneath and create a drain, but there must be some metal hardware involved because I couldn't drill through. Should I be looking for a leak from above (the tiles on top of the stoop look fine)? My other though was to drill hole toward the bottom pillars and stick in some kind of plastic v ent to allow the moisture to escape. Any ideas? Is this a common problem? T hanks!
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I can't see your image. Tinypic seems to block anyone who doesn't enable javascript, which powers the numerous tracking and ad operations embedded in their pages.
In any case, what you describe is common. Several factors can contribute: Column bases are often exposed to the weather. Modern water-base paints don't stand up to moisture. Water can wick underneath.
Solutions are limited. I would scrape it and leave it to dry out. Then put a good oil-base, linseed oil primer on it. Maybe also use caulking around the base, if that's feasible. Then preferably paint it with oil paint. Sherwin Williams still sells exterior oil paint in quarts. Next best would be oil-base solid stain. Failing that, use a decent acrylic or latex paint. It won't hold up, but the primer will hold it for awhile.
Hello I'm painting my front steps and the stoop. The paint has been flaking off the bottom of the support columns, when I peeled it off the wood underneath is waterlogged. This isn't the result of one particular storm, I remember last time I painted, year or two ago, they were wet then too. The columns appear to be at least partially hollow, so my first though was to drill a hole from underneath and create a drain, but there must be some metal hardware involved because I couldn't drill through. Should I be looking for a leak from above (the tiles on top of the stoop look fine)? My other though was to drill hole toward the bottom pillars and stick in some kind of plastic vent to allow the moisture to escape. Any ideas? Is this a common problem? Thanks!
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On Friday, May 30, 2014 10:48:23 AM UTC-4, Mayayana wrote:

The picture appears to show trim molding at the bottom? Those supports should be resting on metal support widgets that are designed to take up the last 3/4" or so. It's like a flat stand with legs on the corners so it's mostly open underneath. That keeps the wood off the deck, so it won't stay wet and rot.
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Yes, It's common. Same thing with door frames.
The wet is not coming from above. Forget a vent. Has it a built up column (i.e., made from several long pieces)? Is that column resting on a separate base?
First thing is to cut out ALL bad wood and repair that. That includes the base if such exists. Coating exposed wood with wood preservative is a good idea...get the stuff used to apply to PT lumber where it is cut.
Next thing is to arrange things so water can't run or be wicked in around the bottom edge. Then prime and paint, preferably with oil paint.
When I've had to repair rot around doors I cut out the bad wood, filled in with Bondo (auto body filler). At the bottom I left a gap of 1/4" or so; the inside edge of the gap slopes up. I then caulk the gap using backer rod if needed. If you do that, use a good caulk but not silicone, it won't paint;
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dadiOH
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com posted for all of us...
And I know how to SNIP

Your column looks exactly like an episode on "Ask this gnarly House" Tom Sliver jacked up the roof then cut the rotten part off and used a scarf joint to replace the rotten stuff. IIRC he used PT wood. While you are doing it do all the columns. Not an uncommon problem.
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Tekkie

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