Front Door Threshold Stripping Question

Wonder if any of you have experience installing rubber weather strips on the bottom of front doors. The finish carpenter that did our front door notched a channel on the bottom of our front door and installed a rubber strip unit. There is a metal flashing screwed the the face of the door and nothing on the inside. the threshold is aluminum. From the side when the door is open you can see the channel. Is this normal? I have another smaller entry door that is to a home office type room that he put a unit on the slips onto the bottom of the door and screws onto the face and inside of the door. He said he did it that way because it was the front door and cosmetically it is not normal to have a strip screwed along the inside bottom of the door.
I am just concerned that if the bottom of that front door that he notched ever rots I have a problem. I would guess that the notch is maybe 1/4" -3/8" and probably about 3/4" in depth running the bottom of the door. Maybe I am thinking ahead of myself but I would have preferred the trim plate on the bottom inside of the door than to alter the door. Also, how does one even replace the rubber strip on such an installation without removing the door and flipping it over. I am assuming on the other type, it just screws and pulls off. Any advice or help would be appreciated. Which is a more normal type of installation?
I am also concerned if I ever need to replace the door that iw will be involved and costly. If the door ever has to be replaced it would be a nightmare as I have had a mortise lock installed, expensive procedure. And I am assuming that installing a new lock on a new door would require filling in the jam and redrilling and mortising all holes for the latches.
I guess that channel can be filled at some point if I ever wanted to put a different type of rubber stripping on it but what a pain.
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Well, personal opinion of course, but, having diy type of experience in these things, I think you're worrying more than you need to. For one, it's not that much of a job to remove the door; pop the pins out of the hinges and lift it out, althouigh it might be heavy. If the guy used good materials, you're probably in good shape for a lot of years and if the installation/surrounding area is "normal" condition, you're in good shape for a good number of years.
Worst case, you've learned something: When something doesn't feel right, ask before the money becomes invested. But I think you'll be all right. Should that wear out, put one of the other kind on, and if it rots, well, it probably won't be the only place rotting or about to rot. Rot usually isn't a problem with properly built doors and thresholds. I've got doors here over 50 years old; still in great shape. Haven't looked close; maybe they've turned to rock by now <g> (petrified).
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Michael Roback wrote:

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