Freezer question, your experience.

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On Jun 2, 7:09 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

who said anything about cardboard milk cartons?
frozen coke cans just pop out the inverted base if yyou freeze them (over here anyways ;>))
Jim K
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wrote

The coke cans do but I can assure you that cans of Stella pop the ring pulls if left in a freezer.
Adam
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That still doesn't make sense. how do they expel the frost, scrape it off and then toss it out somehowwww??? They might mean a self- defrosting freezer, that would make some sense at least.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote

It does actually, tho its been dumbed down like with so many sales speils.

Just replace the new air that has just entered when the lid was opened with dry air that has been passed over the chiller coils so the frost doesnt form inside the freezer where it gets deposited on the food etc.
Thats how the frost free system works.

They arent self defrosting, they just ensure that the frost never forms inside the freezer, the air deposits the mosture outside the freezer before it gets into the freezer.
Thats how any frost free system works.
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wrote:

Both types have pros and cons - I've always been under the impression that the upright types allow a lot of coldness to 'escape' when the door is open compared to chest freezers.
Just how this impacts on electricity usage in the real world, I don't know. *If* it does at all...
The big downside with chest freezers you've already mentioned :) OTOH, if you have a need to put something large in a freezer (the neighbours body... or whatever) - then the chest freezer would be ideal.
I currently have a chest freezer, but am considering an upright as a future replacement.
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That isn't really true -- at most, one or two pounds of cold air escapes and is replaced with warm air. That has almost zero effect on the temperature inside.
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On Thu, 03 Jun 2010 10:48:30 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

It has a very deleterious effect on items that you want to keep for a long time. The warm air that goes in also is loaded with moisture, which is another enemy of DEEP freezers.
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On Thu, 03 Jun 2010 10:48:30 GMT, Doug Miller wrote:

How does non-pressurized air have weight?
-sw
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wrote:

The same way anything else has weight. Did you really think that air weighs nothing?
BTW, there's no such thing as "non-pressurized air". The air you're breathing right now has a pressure of 1 atmosphere, equal to about 14.7 pounds per square inch.
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On Thu, 03 Jun 2010 13:40:45 GMT, Doug Miller wrote:

jeez, no wonder i'm wheezing. i thought it was the cigarettes.
your pal, blake
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On Thu, 03 Jun 2010 13:40:45 GMT, Doug Miller wrote:

Yes. All my scales currently read "0". Yet sitting on top of them are billions of cubic feet of air.
OK, So I had to look it. I don't know the logic behind it, but 1 cubic foot of air at standard temperature and pressure assuming average composition weighs approximately 0.0807 lbs.
So to understand your comment, one would have to know the weight of 0F (approximately) air and then convert that to cubic feet to get any sort of sense what the fuck you actually mean.
Anybody know that off the top of their head? (Some dumbass will of course look it up, post it, and claim they knew it. but this is Usenet - shit like that is a given).
-sw
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wrote:

lol
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Let us know when you own a scale that has 5 sides in a vacuum and just the measuring part exposed to air.
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On Thu, 03 Jun 2010 14:32:34 -0500, AZ Nomad wrote:

Dude, I got one right here. But how do I use that to determine how much cold air I'm losing when I open my freezer?
-sw
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Simple. Evacuate the air from the room. Place freezer on scale, take reading. Open freezer door, let air out. Take another reading. Subtract second from first.
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wrote:

You'd need a gravity scale. lol
Actually you lose it all... if your upright freezer is a 10 cuft model within 2 seconds of opening the door ALL 10 cuft of cold air drops out like it was a lead balloon (minus however much cuft your food occupies).
With a chest freezer in still ambiant air practically zero cuft of air drops out, even if there is no door. Most stupidmarket food freezers/fridges are chest type and have no door... instead they have a fill line and many have add-on deflectors to block air agitation. Food stores are more and more moving away from upright freezer/fridge units.
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So what?
Assume the freezer is half full (5 cu ft food, 5 cu ft air). Five cubic feet of food weighs about 250 pounds. Five cubic feet of air weighs about seven ounces.
Do you *really* believe that replacing seven ounces of zero-degree air with seven ounces of room temperature air is going to make *any* noticeable difference in the temperature of two hundred fifty pounds of food???
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On Fri, 04 Jun 2010 13:49:54 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Guess what? It makes a positively huge difference when that warm air hits the surface of all that stuff that you are trying to keep in as perfect condition as possible for long term storage. The added moisture is another huge benefit.
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On Fri, 04 Jun 2010 08:53:10 -0400, brooklyn1 wrote:

All the freezers and fridges in the isles (100-150 feet long x 4 rows), milk/dairy, and beer (about 80% of the store) are clearly the upright variety (doors and no doors). The only exceptions are the chests in front of the meat displays.
-sw
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Good thing they have windows so you can see what is inside before you use a sawzall to gain entry.
I prefer freezers with doors wether it is an upright or chest. Makes gaining entry so much easier than the sealed types.
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