Framing around a jack post


What is the 'correct' way to hide steel jack posts inside a 2'x4' stud wall? I see lots of online suggestions about 'boxing-in' a post, but could find nothing on building a wall around a post. Assume the post is 3.5" (or less) in diameter.
Obviously, the top and bottom plates cannot pass through the post. Do you simply build two separate walls on either side of the post and then drywall over the top to make a smooth, continuous wall?
Bonus points: Is it possible to build a 90 degree wall such that the jack post is in the corner where the walls meet (vs. the 3-stud method if no jack post was present)?
Thoughts appreciated!
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I built two wall sections and butted them to each side of the post. I also used a temp scab board at the top and bottom of each side to make sure they were straight before screwing them to the floor and the ceiling.
I see no reason you could not do a corner in a like fashion as long as the inside corners met. Now I will need to think about how one would finish the OS corner on the other side. :)
These wall aren't load bearing. They just need to hold the drywall securely.
Colbyt
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You could hole saw the top and bottom plates (very accurately) and cut the hole in half (if 3 1/2", it would just fall in half), then fit these to the post. I'd consider leaving an access hole to the jack part just in case, but I guess you could do that as needed down the road.
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re: "Do you simply build two separate walls on either side of the post and then drywall over the top to make a smooth, continuous wall?"
Yes, but you need to make sure you compensate for the gap so that your studs still land 16" OC. If you don't, you'll have unsupported drywall seams or more seams than needed.
re: Bonus point question...
If the post is in the corner, what is going to support the 90 degree drywall joint? If the 2 sheets are flapping in the breeze, I'd assume the joint is going to crack eventually.
What if you tried this:
Assume 1/2" drywall, for purposes of this discussion.
Position one wall such that it is flush with face of the post.
Position the other wall to leave a 1/2" gap between the post and the first stud.
On the wall that is flush with the face of the post, squeeze the drywall in between the post but "behind" first stud of the other wall so that the post provides support for the drywall. Maybe even drywall that section of the "flush wall" before framing the other wall so you can position the second wall correctly.
I don't know if this will come out correctly, but...
O is the Post D is the Drywall ||| is the Stud Wall flush with Post = is the Other Wall
OD======= |||DDDDDDD |||D |||D |||D
In this manner, your corner should have sufficient support to prevent cracks.
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Thanks for the help, I'll take these suggestions under consideration.
Using the scab as a guide sounds like a good idea...I was planning on snapping a couple of chalk lines to mark the position for the bottom plate (snap around the post)
I'm putting a door between two of the posts, so the 16" O.C. is probably not such an issue. That particular wall will end up being about 6' long so it's going to be a real mess of studs (kings, jacks, cripple, butting against posts, and end-wall).
For the corner, I'm hoping that I have a few inches (5 should do it) to turn a corner 'normally' and then simply embed the post in a straight section of wall as described above. That would ensure that I don't have drywall joint failure (I hope).
If I don't have room, I'll try one of your solutions. To make it easier, the outside of the corner will be in a utility room and does not need to be finished.
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Borrall Wonnell wrote:

...
As somebody else said, just frame it w/ 2x6 instead of 2x4; won't be enough difference in material cost to matter and saves much other pita machinations.
Ditto on that poster's remarks re: jack post as well.
--
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Oddly enough, I've actually got space to do this in one case. I'd still have to use a hole saw for top/bottom plates and split-fit around the post, but at least there'd be a continuous surface.
For the other instance, there just isn't any room to put a 2x6. The wall will already be uncomfortably close to my cleanout/drain.

There are two things working against that idea: 1) My terminology may be incorrect. What I'm calling a jack post is a hollow steel post that has a threaded cylinder at the top for height adjustability. I hadn't even heard of a lally column until today (either nobody around here uses 'em, or nobody calls 'em lally columns). Perhaps we're talking about the same thing, only in different jurisdictions (think North). 2) The jack posts are already a fixture and I don't see the point of replacing them. It is likely that they are resting on concrete footings poured specifically for them, so I'm not sure what the problem would be (see #1).
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FYI a lally column is constructed of pipe or tubing with bearing plates top and bottom. They are code required in many communities nationwide. Contractors may order them done as building progresses, or ahead of time if they have a decent plan set. A jack post does not have the load carrying capacity of a lally column but in some case it may not have to. On some projects I have easily made my own with my building inspector's approval. Any well supply company has pipe of all diameters that can be code approved. The pipe is given a rust resisting paint coat inside if it needs it, and the bearing plates welded on and outer part painted.. The temporary support (jack post, even) is removed after the lally column is installed on the footing and the concrete floor is poured around it. People living in places where concrete blocks on slabs are the usual construction method would likely know little about lally columns. Architects and better contractors, though, will be quite familiar with them in most other parts of the country.
Joe
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Borrall Wonnell wrote:

_WAY_ over-thunk for the need. Simply fit the wall framing in the space between the columns and fasten to the floor w/ tapcons or powder-actuated nails and the overhead structure (joists in perpendicular, blocking if parallel). Done.

...
Well, the thickness of the columns is what it is--if you're intent on a smooth wall surface that's that thickness plus thickness of the wall covering is what it's going to be.
If it's >2x4 but less than 2x6, rip the 2x6 is probably still faster than adding shims but is less of a difference if must, granted.
As for the lally-column debate, all depends on what the actual jacks are. They can be adequate and if were original construction one can assume they met local Code (assuming was done as part of original construction, etc., etc., etc., ...). Many of the temporaries aren't of much use for more than that.
--
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If it didn't waste too much space. I would do the framing with 2 x 6's since the price difference is worth the time saved. I am not a big fan of jack posts except as temporary supports, so a lally column would be my choice. If 2 x 4's are absolutely necessary, then consider a lally column made from schedule 80 pipe with the appropriate diameter to fit the space.
Joe
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Yup...Just run the drywall over the gap...

I would just box it in if you have the room and throw a piece of cornerbead on it after drywalling it...HTH..

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